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Blood work during RT, what does it mean, Worry?
  1. #1
    orchids58 Guest

    Default Blood work during RT, what does it mean, Worry?

    Hi guys,
    I thought I would put a new post on this after all.

    Ike got bloodwork done at his regular Dr. and this is what it showed.
    WBC 6.7 K/UL 4.1---10.9
    RBC 5.6 M/UL 4.7--6.0
    HGB 18.2 G/DL CRITCAL HIGH 13.5--18.0
    HCT 53.9 % HIGH 42.0--52.0
    MCH 32.4 PG HIGH 26.KK0--32.0
    PLT 154.0 KK/UL 37.0--92.0
    CO2 MMOL/L HIGH 23.0--29.0
    TRIG 182 MG/DL HIGH 35--160

    URINALYSIS
    BLOOD TRACE NEGATIVE

    I looked it up under test, but not sure about its importance.
    Charlotte


  2. #2
    Glassman@work Guest

    Default Re: Blood work during RT, what does it mean, Worry?


    "orchids58" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] oups.com...
    > Hi guys,
    > I thought I would put a new post on this after all.
    >
    > Ike got bloodwork done at his regular Dr. and this is what it showed.
    > WBC 6.7 K/UL 4.1---10.9
    > RBC 5.6 M/UL 4.7--6.0
    > HGB 18.2 G/DL CRITCAL HIGH 13.5--18.0
    > HCT 53.9 % HIGH 42.0--52.0
    > MCH 32.4 PG HIGH 26.KK0--32.0
    > PLT 154.0 KK/UL 37.0--92.0
    > CO2 MMOL/L HIGH 23.0--29.0
    > TRIG 182 MG/DL HIGH 35--160
    >
    > URINALYSIS
    > BLOOD TRACE NEGATIVE
    >
    > I looked it up under test, but not sure about its importance.
    > Charlotte
    >


    Numbers aside, doesn't your doc discuss all this with him & you?


    --
    JK Sinrod
    www.SinrodStudios.com
    www.MyConeyIslandMemories.com



  3. #3
    orchids58 Guest

    Default Re: Blood work during RT, what does it mean, Worry?

    On May 19, 1:34 pm, "Glassman@work" <jksinrod*SP...@aol.com> wrote:
    > "orchids58" <orchid...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected] oups.com...
    >
    > > Hi guys,
    > > I thought I would put a new post on this after all.

    >
    > > Ike got bloodwork done at his regular Dr. and this is what it showed.
    > > WBC 6.7 K/UL 4.1---10.9
    > > RBC 5.6 M/UL 4.7--6.0
    > > HGB 18.2 G/DL CRITCAL HIGH 13.5--18.0
    > > HCT 53.9 % HIGH 42.0--52.0
    > > MCH 32.4 PG HIGH 26.KK0--32.0
    > > PLT 154.0 KK/UL 37.0--92.0
    > > CO2 MMOL/L HIGH 23.0--29.0
    > > TRIG 182 MG/DL HIGH 35--160

    >
    > > URINALYSIS
    > > BLOOD TRACE NEGATIVE

    >
    > > I looked it up under test, but not sure about its importance.
    > > Charlotte

    >
    > Numbers aside, doesn't your doc discuss all this with him & you?
    >
    > --
    > JK Sinrodwww.SinrodStudios.comwww.MyConeyIslandMemori es.com


    Dear JK,

    I know this is not the norm, but Ike goes to Doctor now, without me.
    The blood and urine test were done after office visit, May 15th and
    then mailed to him. A note on it said, " will review at next office
    visit ", 3 months down the road. Three months is a long time for me
    to wonder about this. I wanted to go with him Friday for his
    treatment , but he doesn't want to have any confrontation with anyone
    but me.

    I asked him to take it with him to his Radiation treatment on Friday,
    let them make a copy, put it in his records and then bring the
    original back. I did get him to take it, and I hope he had them copy
    it into his records there. I think the radiation oncologist should
    know. They only weigh him once a week on Monday, ask how are you
    doing, but don't seem interested in what I ask or he tells them. I
    have to stay home for that reason. They always bring up the internet
    to me, like that was a deffinite no no.

    I really must be missing something !
    Charlotte

    He doesn't like any questions about all this, and I upset him if I ask
    him questions, that I would certainly ask if it were me. He will have
    his 18th treatment Monday.


  4. #4
    c palmer Guest

    Default Re: Blood work during RT, what does it mean, Worry?

    Hi guys,
    I thought I would put a new post on this after all.
    Ike got bloodwork done at his regular Dr. and this is what it showed.
    WBC 6.7 K/UL * 4.1---10.9
    RBC * 5.6 M/UL * * 4.7--6.0
    HGB 18.2 G/DL * * CRITCAL HIGH * 13.5--18.0
    HCT 53.9 * % HIGH * 42.0--52.0
    MCH 32.4 PG * HIGH 26.KK0--32.0
    PLT 154.0 KK/UL * * 37.0--92.0
    CO2 * MMOL/L * * HIGH * 23.0--29.0
    TRIG * 182 MG/DL * * HIGH * 35--160
    URINALYSIS
    BLOOD TRACE NEGATIVE
    I looked it up under test, but not sure about its importance. Charlotte

    ======> hi charlotte - after some research, i posted what is "normal',
    but if you read the write up, it explains what "normal" really is.
    hope this helps.

    ~ curtis

    ------------------------------------------

    Electrolytes: These are your potassium, sodium, chloride, and CO2
    levels.

    CO2 reflects the acid status of your blood. Low CO2 levels can be due to
    either to increased acidity from uncontrolled diabetes, kidney disease,
    metabolic disorders, or low CO2 can be due to chronic hyperventilation.

    Triglyceride is fat in the blood which, if elevated, has been associated
    with heart disease, especially if over 500 mg. High triglycerides are
    also associated with pancreatitis. Triglyceride levels over 150 mg/dl
    may be associated with problems other than heart disease.

    The hemoglobin is the amount of oxygen carrying protein contained within
    the red blood cells. The hematocrit is the percentage of the blood
    volume occupied by red blood cells. In most labs the Hgb is actually
    measured, while the Hct is computed using the RBC measurement and the
    MCV measurement. Thus purists prefer to use the Hgb measurement as more
    reliable. Low Hgb or Hct suggest an anemia. Anemia can be due to
    nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, destruction of blood cells
    internally, or failure to produce blood in the bone marrow. High Hgb can
    occur due to lung disease, living at high altitude, or excessive bone
    marrow production of blood cells.

    Because most Blood test reference ranges (often referred to as 'normal'
    ranges of Blood test results) are typically defined as the range of
    values of the median 95% of the healthy population, it is unlikely that
    a given Blood sample, even from a healthy patient, will show "normal"
    values for every Blood test taken. Therefore, caution should be
    exercised to prevent overreaction to mild abnormalities without the
    interpretation of those tests by your examining physician. Again, a
    Blood test, though important, is only a part of the final diagnosis of a
    health problem.


    No Blood test is completely accurate all of the time. Sometimes a test
    result is incorrectly abnormal in a person who does not have the
    suspected disease (a false-positive result). Sometimes a test result is
    incorrectly normal in a person who has the disease (a false-negative
    result). Tests are rated in terms of their sensitivity (the probability
    that their Blood testing results will be positive when a disease is
    present) and their specificity (the probability that their test results
    will be negative when a disease is not present). A very sensitive test
    is unlikely to miss the disease in people who have it, however, it may
    falsely indicate disease in healthy people. A very specific test is
    unlikely to indicate disease in healthy people. Although, it may miss
    the disease in some who have it. Problems with sensitivity and
    specificity can be largely overcome by using several different Blood
    tests.


    Normal test result values are expressed as a reference range, which is
    based on the average values in a healthy population; 95% of healthy
    people have values within this range. These values vary somewhat among
    laboratories, due to methodology and even geography. Blood tests and
    Blood testing methods and quality vary widely in different parts of the
    world and in different parts of many countries, due to characteristics
    in the population, both racial Blood differences and ethnic Blood
    characteristics, among other factors. *


    American Blood laboratories use a different version of the metric system
    than does most of the rest of the world, which uses the Systeme
    Internationale (SI). In some cases translation between the two systems
    is easy, but the difference between the two is most pronounced in the
    measurement of chemical concentration. The American system generally
    uses mass per unit volume, while SI uses moles per unit volume. Since
    mass per mole varies with the molecular weight of the substance being
    analyzed, conversion between American and SI units requires many
    different conversion factors.

    Keep in mind that there are three Blood test "normal ranges."

    Normal Range Results
    The results of virtually all Blood tests ordered in North America are
    compared to "normal ranges" as provided on a "Lab Results Report."* If
    your tests indicate that you are within the normal range, you are most
    often considered normal.*A "normal" Blood test result does not
    necessarily mean that you are healthy.*The problem with these lies in
    how "normal ranges" are determined at that particular Blood testing
    laboratory.
    *
    Population Best/Optimum Ranges

    In our opinion, every Blood test result must be compared to Blood test
    result scores other than the accepted lab "norms."*Your potential
    statistical best possible Blood test ranges must be considered. These
    Blood test range "best" results should interpreted considering your
    physiology and unique biochemistry such as your height your weight, age,
    gender, health history since childhood. Further, the inter-relationship
    with your other blood test scores must be considered. One imbalance
    often causes another. Blood test range scores outside your unique Blood
    test range results can be affected by sleep, diet, exercise, medicines,
    and vitamin supplements.
    *
    Your Personal Norms
    Your Blood test score, chronicled over time, will vary by few points,
    one way or the other. These Blood test results, considering sleep, diet,
    exercise, medicines, and vitamin supplements, etc. will most certainly
    vary.*Each person on any given day has their own set of Blood test
    results.

    Consider your gas mileage in your car. If reviewed over time, each time
    you fill up and record your gas mileage, it varies. The car is the same,
    the driver is the same, the gas is the same, but the mileage, from
    fill-up to fill-up varies. We recommend periodical Personal Blood
    Testing.

    *Your personal norms must be considered over time. Each individual has
    his or her own unique personal Blood test normal range, best for you.
    Remember, if you do not get Blood tests, and if you do not keep track of
    them, and if you do not have them available to your doctor, You will not
    know and can not use your normal Blood test range.

    *

    Reference Range (conventional units*)
    17 Hydroxyprogesterone (Men)0.06-3.0 mg/L
    17 Hydroxyprogesterone (Women) Follicular phase0.2-1.0 mg/
    L25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D)8-80 ng/m
    LAcetoacetate<3 mg/dLAcidity (pH) 7.35 - 7.45 Alcohol 0 mg/dL (more than
    0.1 mg/dL normally indicates intoxication) (ethanol)
    Ammonia 15 - 50 g of nitrogen/dL Amylase 53 - 123 units/L
    Ascorbic Acid 0.4 - 1.5 mg/dL
    Bicarbonate 18 - 23 mEq/L (carbon dioxide content) Bilirubin Direct: up
    to 0.4 mg/dL
    Total: up to 1.0 mg/dL Blood Volume 8.5 - 9.1% of total body weight
    Calcium 8.5 - 10.5 mg/dL (normally slightly higher in children)
    Carbon Dioxide Pressure 35 - 45 mm Hg Carbon Monoxide Less than 5% of
    total hemoglobin
    CD4 Cell Count 500 - 1500 cells/L
    Ceruloplasmin 15 - 60 mg/dL
    Chloride 98 - 106 mEq/LComplete Blood Cell Count (CBC) Tests include:
    hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular
    hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, platelet count, white
    Blood cell count
    Copper Total: 70 - 150 g/dL
    Creatine Kinase (CK or CPK) Male: 38 - 174 units/L
    Female: 96 - 140 units/L*

    Creatine Kinase Isoenzymes 5% MB or less Creatinine 0.6 - 1.2 mg/dL
    Electrolytes Test includes: calcium, chloride, magnesium, potassium,
    sodium

    Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR or Sed-Rate) Male: 1 - 13 mm/hr
    Female: 1 - 20 mm/hr
    Glucose Tested after fasting: 70 - 110 mg/dL Hematocrit Male: 45 - 62%
    Female: 37 - 48%
    Hemoglobin Male: 13 - 18 gm/dL
    Female: 12 - 16 gm/dL Iron 60 - 160 g/dL (normally higher in males)
    Iron-binding Capacity 250 - 460 g/dL
    Lactate (lactic acid) Venous: 4.5 - 19.8 mg/dL
    Arterial: 4.5 - 14.4 mg/dL Lactic Dehydrogenase 50 - 150 units/L Lead 40
    g/dL or less (normally much lower in children) Lipase 10 - 150
    units/L Zinc * B-Zn 70 - 102 mol/L Lipids: ** Cholesterol Less
    than 225 mg/dL (for age 40-49 yr; increases with age) **
    Triglycerides 10 - 29 years** 53 - 104 mg/dL30 - 39 years** 55 -
    115 mg/dL40 - 49 years** 66 - 139 mg/dL 50 - 59 years** 75 - 163
    mg/dL60 - 69 years** 78 - 158 mg/dL** >* 70 years** 83 -
    141 mg/dL

    Liver Function Tests Tests include bilirubin (total), phosphatase
    (alkaline), protein (total and albumin), transaminases (alanine and
    aspartate), prothrombin (PTT)

    Magnesium 1.5 - 2.0 mEq/L Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH) 27 - 32
    pg/cell Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC)32 - 36%
    hemoglobin/cell Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) 76 - 100 cu m
    Osmolality 280 - 296 mOsm/kg water Oxygen Pressure 83 - 100 mm Hg Oxygen
    Saturation (arterial) 96 - 100%P
    hosphatase, Prostatic 0 - 3 units/dL (Bodansky units) (acid)

    Phosphatase 50 - 160 units/L (normally higher in infants and
    adolescents) (alkaline)

    Phosphorus 3.0 - 4.5 mg/dL (inorganic) Platelet Count 150,000 -
    350,000/mLPotassium 3.5 - 5.0 mEq/L
    Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) 0 - 4 ng/mL (likely higher with age)
    Proteins: ** Total 6.0 - 8.4 gm/dL** Albumin 3.5 - 5.0
    gm/dL**
    Globulin 2.3 - 3.5 gm/dLProthrombin (PTT) 25 - 41 sec
    Pyruvic Acid 0.3 - 0.9 mg/dL
    Red Blood Cell Count (RBC) 4.2 - 6.9 million/L/cu mm
    Sodium 135 - 145 mEq/L Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) 0.5 - 6.0
    units/mL
    Transaminase: **
    Alanine (ALT) 1 - 21 units/L **
    Aspartate (AST) 7 - 27 units/L Urea Nitrogen (BUN) 7 - 18 mg/dL
    BUN/Creatinine Ratio5 - 35
    Uric Acid Male ** 2.1 to 8.5 mg/dL (likely higher with age)Female
    ** 2.0 to 7.0 mg/dL (likely higher with age)
    Vitamin A 30 - 65 g/dL
    WBC (leukocyte count and white Blood cell count)4.3-10.8 103/mm3
    White Blood Cell Count (WBC)4,300 - 10,800 cells/L/cu mm

    knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional
    "Many more men die with prostate cancer than of it. Growing old is
    invariably fatal. Prostate cancer is only sometimes so."
    http://community.webtv.net/PALMER_ENT/doc


  5. #5
    Leonard Evens Guest

    Default Re: Blood work during RT, what does it mean, Worry?

    orchids58 wrote:
    > Hi guys,
    > I thought I would put a new post on this after all.
    >
    > Ike got bloodwork done at his regular Dr. and this is what it showed.
    > WBC 6.7 K/UL 4.1---10.9
    > RBC 5.6 M/UL 4.7--6.0
    > HGB 18.2 G/DL CRITCAL HIGH 13.5--18.0
    > HCT 53.9 % HIGH 42.0--52.0
    > MCH 32.4 PG HIGH 26.KK0--32.0
    > PLT 154.0 KK/UL 37.0--92.0
    > CO2 MMOL/L HIGH 23.0--29.0
    > TRIG 182 MG/DL HIGH 35--160
    >
    > URINALYSIS
    > BLOOD TRACE NEGATIVE


    I am not a physician, but I did a google search on "medical tests XXX"
    with XXX the abbreviations above.

    He apparently had a complete blood count plus a Carbon Dioxide
    measurement, a measurement of triglycerides , and a urinalysis. The
    results seem mostly to be either in the normal range or just slightly
    above it.

    I don't know what "CRITICAL HIGH" means for the hemoglobin (HGB). It is
    barely above the normal range. Usually they are worried about it being
    too low, which would indicate anemia which may indicate a serious
    problem. Again let me emphasize that I'm not a physician, but I would
    be a bit surprised if they got too excited by those readings. But it is
    possible that there is something subtle that a good doctor might see in
    the total picture, so it is worth asking the doctor about it. One thing
    that can raise hemoglobin is smoking. Is he a smoker?

    I don't understand the range for PLT which presumably means platelet
    count in thousands per mircroliter. The normal range I found is 150 to
    450. It doesn't say the result is abnormal, so maybe there was a typo
    in the range.

    It doesn't say what the CO2 is, so I can't tell whether it is so high it
    is likely to be significant. If it is just slightly high, it may mean
    not very much. If it is very high, it could indicate a serious problem.

    The triglicerides are high, but that is not unusual. It reflects his
    diet and I think it can be affected by what he has been eating recently.
    I've had readings that high and no one thought it worth worrying
    about. But, that together with his blood fats, if they were tested,
    might suggest that he would be better off with a better diet. That
    could be helpful in the long term in avoiding heart disease or stroke.

    Most of us assume that a doctor actually looks at the results before
    sending them to you. But often that is a mistaken assumption. So don't
    be self conscious about insisting on some sort of explanation.

    >
    > I looked it up under test, but not sure about its importance.
    > Charlotte
    >


  6. #6
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Blood work during RT, what does it mean, Worry?

    Leonard Evens wrote:

    > The triglicerides are high, but that is not unusual. It reflects his
    > diet and I think it can be affected by what he has been eating recently.
    > I've had readings that high and no one thought it worth worrying
    > about. But, that together with his blood fats, if they were tested,
    > might suggest that he would be better off with a better diet. That
    > could be helpful in the long term in avoiding heart disease or stroke.


    There's strong indication that high triglycerides combined with low HDL
    is of greater concern than "high cholesterol", particularly at our age.
    The many ways to improve that balance include statins, fish oil, cutting
    back on excess carbs, and exercise.

    I.P.

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