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Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer
  1. #1
    Iowa Guest

    Default Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    I have Agent Orange prostate cancer. I am now 100% totally disabled and
    receiving VA disability compensation. I have had a new type of radiation
    treatment called Tomotherapy. This was not provided by the VA but approved
    by Medicare and paid for by them. This low dose radiation was completed
    after 39 week day treatments (Saturday and Sunday, excluded). I have just
    completed my last treatment.

    Question: How long will VA 100% disability compensation continue? What are
    the VA rules relating to this disability? I am told that this radiation
    treatment will not be a cure but offers remission of the cancer. The doctors
    consider me cancer free (prostate) if no cancer returns after 10 years? Any
    simular circumstances?


  2. #2
    P. Parker Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    Hi, I am a Vietnam Vet now 55 years old and diagnosed with Prostate
    cancer, I am super healthy, I don't even get a cold in the winter time,
    eat right and keep fit. How did you know that Agent Orange was the
    cause?

    Phil

    Iowa wrote:
    > I have Agent Orange prostate cancer. I am now 100% totally disabled and
    > receiving VA disability compensation. I have had a new type of radiation
    > treatment called Tomotherapy. This was not provided by the VA but approved
    > by Medicare and paid for by them. This low dose radiation was completed
    > after 39 week day treatments (Saturday and Sunday, excluded). I have just
    > completed my last treatment.
    >
    > Question: How long will VA 100% disability compensation continue? What are
    > the VA rules relating to this disability? I am told that this radiation
    > treatment will not be a cure but offers remission of the cancer. The doctors
    > consider me cancer free (prostate) if no cancer returns after 10 years? Any
    > simular circumstances?



  3. #3
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    Iowa wrote:
    > I have Agent Orange prostate cancer. I am now 100% totally disabled and
    > receiving VA disability compensation. I have had a new type of radiation
    > treatment called Tomotherapy. This was not provided by the VA but approved
    > by Medicare and paid for by them. This low dose radiation was completed
    > after 39 week day treatments (Saturday and Sunday, excluded). I have just
    > completed my last treatment.
    >
    > Question: How long will VA 100% disability compensation continue? What are
    > the VA rules relating to this disability?
    >

    1. As long as you're 100% disabled, I assume. But
    2. We all know what "assume" does to u and me, so why not ask the VA and
    get an answer you can rely on?
    3. We must also assume your disability is unrelated to your prostate
    cancer, because its early stages or initial treatments don't normally
    disable us appreciably. Could you fill us in further?

    I.P.

  4. #4
    Steve Kramer Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer


    "Iowa" <u30042@uwe> wrote in message news:6a6f75d74a873@uwe...
    >I have Agent Orange prostate cancer. I am now 100% totally disabled and
    > receiving VA disability compensation. I have had a new type of radiation
    > treatment called Tomotherapy. This was not provided by the VA but
    > approved
    > by Medicare and paid for by them. This low dose radiation was completed
    > after 39 week day treatments (Saturday and Sunday, excluded). I have just
    > completed my last treatment.
    >
    > Question: How long will VA 100% disability compensation continue? What
    > are
    > the VA rules relating to this disability? I am told that this radiation
    > treatment will not be a cure but offers remission of the cancer. The
    > doctors
    > consider me cancer free (prostate) if no cancer returns after 10 years?
    > Any
    > simular circumstances?


    That you for your service to our country. What branch were you in?

    As to cure, it depends on when you were diagnosed and what your stage was.
    If it was T3 or T4, then RT doesnt' offer a cure. If it was T1 or T2 with a
    low PSA and low Gleason, then maybe. As to 10 years, who knows? Prostate
    cancer has been known to come back after 15. However, after 5 years, your
    chances are pretty good.




    --
    PSA 16 10/17/2000 @ 46
    Biopsy 11/01/2000 G7 (3+4), T2c
    RRP 12/15/2000 G7 (3+4), T3cN0M0 Neg margins
    PSA .1 .1 .1 .27 .37 .75
    EBRT 05-07/2002 @ 47
    PSA .34 .22 .15 .21 .32
    Lupron 07/03 (1 mo) 8/03 (4 mo), 12/03, 4/04, 09/04, 01/05, 5/05, 10/05,
    2/06, 6/06
    PSA .07 .05 .06 .09 .08 .132 .145
    Casodex added daily 07/06
    PSA <0.04
    Non Illegitimi Carborundum


    >




  5. #5
    Bob C. Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    Iowa wrote:
    > I have Agent Orange prostate cancer. I am now 100% totally disabled and
    > receiving VA disability compensation. I have had a new type of radiation
    > treatment called Tomotherapy. This was not provided by the VA but approved
    > by Medicare and paid for by them. This low dose radiation was completed
    > after 39 week day treatments (Saturday and Sunday, excluded). I have just
    > completed my last treatment.
    >
    > Question: How long will VA 100% disability compensation continue? What are
    > the VA rules relating to this disability? I am told that this radiation
    > treatment will not be a cure but offers remission of the cancer. The doctors
    > consider me cancer free (prostate) if no cancer returns after 10 years? Any
    > simular circumstances?
    >

    The VA generally considers you at 100% during any active treatment, and
    for six months following cessation of that treatment. This is a
    temporary disability rating. Before they change your compensation rating
    they will call you in for an evaluation, and it could easily go well
    beyond the stated six months. They are apparently understaffed and
    behind most of the time. Your veterans service officer should be able to
    fill you in on other particulars. One item of particular importance, per
    my local Veterans Officer, is evidence. They require evidence for
    everything, spelled out and in black and white by your heath care
    providers. Keeping them up to date and informed of any treatments and
    your progress is important.



    The VA has been very helpful to me, with my PCa presumed to be a result
    of agent orange. I hope that you find them as helpful.

    If you were willing to share your particulars, psa readings then and
    now, gleason, age, etc., all that stuff, with the group here we would be
    very interested in hearing of your progress. The treatment you speak of
    has not been much discussed here and many of us would be very interested
    in hearing from you.

    Best of luck to you. Bob C

  6. #6
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    Bob C. wrote:
    >
    > The VA generally considers you at 100% during any active treatment, and
    > for six months following cessation of that treatment. This is a
    > temporary disability rating.


    This is an eye-opener for me. I've had many VA surgeries, have never
    gotten any disability awards from the surgeries, have 19 different other
    disabilities totaling 40%, have gotten all of them by my own efforts
    directly with the VA, have seen them take years to get in the first
    place, and have seen some or all of them lost several times due to VA
    errors which have taken and are still taking years to correct. These
    hassles are not unique to my location; they've involved several states,
    VA hospitals, and regional offices, plus e-mail, snail-mail, telephone,
    and face-to-face communications totaling many scores of pages of
    documentation and months of work.

    As a whole it's paid off, but the effort is so daunting and so often
    fruitless that I've all but dropped my efforts to add another
    well-warranted (according to an e-mail to me from the national VA
    director) 10%, which would push me into the 50% zone and the major tax,
    pay, and care benefits it provides pursuant to Category I status.

    > Before they change your compensation rating
    > they will call you in for an evaluation, and it could easily go well
    > beyond the stated six months. They are apparently understaffed and
    > behind most of the time.


    Now THAT'S no surprise, and these days is probably a major
    understatement. My evaluation for that next 10% disability supported my
    claim seven years ago, but has yet to produce any results. Until I suck
    it up, abandon most other activities for a few weeks, and take the VA on
    for a third blitz on this issue, nothing's going to happen.

    ON THE OTHER HAND, try WORKING while receiving 100% disability
    compensation and see how quickly one gets caught, prosecuted, fined HUGE
    punitive amounts, and/or imprisoned. THAT they're efficient at. It's
    almost like they're more focused on punishing cheats than taking care of
    deserving beneficiaries.

    I.P.

  7. #7
    c palmer Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    From: [email protected] (P.*Parker)
    Hi, I am a Vietnam Vet now 55 years old and diagnosed with Prostate
    cancer, I am super healthy, I don't even get a cold in the winter time,
    eat right and keep fit. How did you know that Agent Orange was the
    cause?
    Phil

    =====> hi phil - interesting that you said that.

    as a vietnam vet too - that could have been me. i was ALWAYS healthy as
    a horse. never went to the doctor for years. in fact - only went to a
    doctor once in 16 years from age 40 to 56 and that was at age 51. even
    then, he said that i was in good shape.

    then, on my 57th birthday, i got the news of my elevated psa, which lead
    to the biopsy, which lead to the news of my pca. also, got word of my
    skin cancer about the same time. then, my blood pressure took off
    (never had high blood pressure ever), then, my knees gave out and
    require surgery, then...... well, you get the picture........

    so, i will say enjoy your health while you have it and i want to wish
    you long, long time of excellent health.

    but you were exposed to some nasty stuff over there and it takes time
    for it to show up.

    sorry that you had to pay the dues to become a member.

    ~ curtis

    knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional
    "Many more men die with prostate cancer than of it. Growing old is
    invariably fatal. Prostate cancer is only sometimes so."
    http://community.webtv.net/PALMER_ENT/doc


  8. #8
    Bob C. Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    I.P. Freely wrote:
    > Bob C. wrote:
    >>
    >> The VA generally considers you at 100% during any active treatment,
    >> and for six months following cessation of that treatment. This is a
    >> temporary disability rating.

    >
    > This is an eye-opener for me. I've had many VA surgeries, have never
    > gotten any disability awards from the surgeries,

    Service connected disabilities? My limited knowledge may pertain only to
    some of the rules pertaining to cancer from AO exposure.
    have 19 different other
    > disabilities totaling 40%, have gotten all of them by my own efforts
    > directly with the VA, have seen them take years to get in the first
    > place, and have seen some or all of them lost several times due to VA
    > errors which have taken and are still taking years to correct. These
    > hassles are not unique to my location; they've involved several states,
    > VA hospitals, and regional offices, plus e-mail, snail-mail, telephone,
    > and face-to-face communications totaling many scores of pages of
    > documentation and months of work.

    I channeled my initial requests through one of the vet organizations, at
    the suggestion of my local Veteran Officer. He said pick one, any one,
    no preferences on his part. After that I have channeled all of my
    correspondences, including medical updates, through him, and he passes
    them on. This gives me a single place to go for complaints, advice,
    requests, etc.. I have not always agreed with their findings and they
    have not always agreed with my requests, but like I have been told
    numerous times, they base everything on evidence, evidence, and
    evidence. Documented medical evidence. I have had occasions where what I
    presented as evidence was not what they needed so I was turned down and
    had to do over. In most instances, I have heard back from them with
    rulings within about three months or so.
    >
    > As a whole it's paid off, but the effort is so daunting and so often
    > fruitless that I've all but dropped my efforts to add another
    > well-warranted (according to an e-mail to me from the national VA
    > director) 10%, which would push me into the 50% zone and the major tax,
    > pay, and care benefits it provides pursuant to Category I status.
    >
    > > Before they change your compensation rating
    > > they will call you in for an evaluation, and it could easily go well
    > > beyond the stated six months. They are apparently understaffed and
    > > behind most of the time.

    >
    > Now THAT'S no surprise, and these days is probably a major
    > understatement.

    Understated, yes. We pretty much know that the VA situation gets worse
    all the time. The additional burden of all these currently returning
    damaged vets on top of a work load that was already barely manageable
    makes it harder for all involved, and you know that many of these
    returning vets NEED HELP NOW, not a few months from now. The VA seems to
    get publicized promises of financial help from our political leaders,
    especially when these leaders are asking for public support for the
    effort, but then something happens and just the opposite happens. They
    get cuts instead, for this reason or another.
    My evaluation for that next 10% disability supported my
    > claim seven years ago, but has yet to produce any results.

    Their letter of determination, or official ruling, should spell out why
    they ruled how they did. Last page, down at the bottom. From it you
    hopefully should be able to see what evidence they lack, if that is the
    case. Battles like yours, none of us need. Whether they rule for or
    against you, you sure should be told the reasons for their decisions in
    a timely fashion.
    Until I suck
    > it up, abandon most other activities for a few weeks, and take the VA on
    > for a third blitz on this issue, nothing's going to happen.

    No matter what, I'd sure try and channel everything through one
    Veterans Service Officer. It looks like I lucked out and got a really
    good one, one who believes in SERVICE. Good luck I.P.

  9. #9
    Mary Fisher Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer


    "Iowa" <u30042@uwe> wrote in message news:6a6f75d74a873@uwe...

    .... the VA

    Sorry to butt in here but will someone tell me what VA is please?

    Mary
    >




  10. #10
    c palmer Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    ... the VA

    Sorry to butt in here but will someone tell me what VA is please?
    Mary

    ====> you're not butting in mary. VA stands for Veteran's
    Administration in america.

    this is the organization where the veterans have to file claims for any
    compensation as well as the VA is in charge for the medical care of the
    veteran.

    knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional
    "Many more men die with prostate cancer than of it. Growing old is
    invariably fatal. Prostate cancer is only sometimes so."
    http://community.webtv.net/PALMER_ENT/doc


  11. #11
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    c palmer wrote:
    > i was ALWAYS healthy as
    > a horse. never went to the doctor for years. in fact - only went to a
    > doctor once in 16 years from age 40 to 56 and that was at age 51. even
    > then, he said that i was in good shape.
    >
    > then, on my 57th birthday, i got the news of my elevated psa, which lead
    > to the biopsy, which lead to the news of my pca. also, got word of my
    > skin cancer about the same time. then, my blood pressure took off
    > (never had high blood pressure ever), then, my knees gave out and
    > require surgery


    Sorry to use you as an example, Curtis, but how does anyone who doesn't
    visit a doc from age 40-56 even KNOW whether he has problems cropping
    up? PSA, skin cancer, hypertension, even knees -- not to mention a few
    dozen other problems -- would show up far sooner, maybe while still
    innocuous and easily treatable, in lab checkups or office visits than in
    symptoms. MANY, if not MOST, medical problems give adequate warning
    before getting serious, but if we aren't looking for them annually or at
    the slightest unexplainable twinge, we don't know they exist.

    I've taken some embarrassingly small anomalies to doctors before, only
    to be told several times, "You were right to raise this flag; this could
    or WOULD have gotten serious if ignored."

    I.P.

  12. #12
    c palmer Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    From: [email protected]w (I.P.*Freely)

    c palmer wrote:
    i was ALWAYS healthy as
    a horse. never went to the doctor for years. in fact - only went to a
    doctor once in 16 years from age 40 to 56 and that was at age 51. even
    then, he said that i was in good shape.
    then, on my 57th birthday, i got the news of my elevated psa, which lead
    to the biopsy, which lead to the news of my pca. * also, got word of
    my skin cancer about the same time. * then, my blood pressure took off
    (never had high blood pressure ever), then, my knees gave out and
    require surgery

    Sorry to use you as an example, Curtis, but how does anyone who doesn't
    visit a doc from age 40-56 even KNOW whether he has problems cropping
    up? PSA, skin cancer, hypertension, even knees -- not to mention a few
    dozen other problems -- would show up far sooner, maybe while still
    innocuous and easily treatable, in lab checkups or office visits than in
    symptoms. MANY, if not MOST, medical problems give adequate warning
    before getting serious, but if we aren't looking for them annually or at
    the slightest unexplainable twinge, we don't know they exist.
    I've taken some embarrassingly small anomalies to doctors before, only
    to be told several times, "You were right to raise this flag; this could
    or WOULD have gotten serious if ignored."
    I.P.

    ====> hi I.P. - i don't mind being used as the example. in fact, that
    is what i've trying to convey - the fact that all my life - i felt ok.
    if i wanted to do something..... i did. the old saying about you don't
    realize just how nice it is to have your health - until you don't have
    it is very true.

    when i was in service - i always got a healthy report. i guess it just
    re-inforced my belief that i was doing ok. then, when i got out, my
    wife had all the health problems and we could only afford the health
    insurance for her and even that got to be too expensive. but it was
    understood between us that since i was the healthy one - i would do
    without the insurance.

    then at age 51, even though i "felt" ok, i thought i was time to pull
    into the pit stop and raise the hood to see how things are. so, when i
    went to the doctor - i specifically ask for a psa test and when i saw on
    the follow visit - all he told me about my psa test was that is was ok.
    i was never told a number and i was not aware of just how important the
    psa numbers were at the time, but learned soon afterwards.

    but i'm not side stepping your question - how does anyone who doesn't
    visit a doc from age 40-56 even KNOW whether he has problems cropping
    up?

    i would have to say that i tried my best to stay in tuned with my body.
    if i didn't feel right, i got checked out. it's just that there is a
    lot of difference in being young and having the cold or flu and
    everything is ok - elsewhere, than being older and not having the flu
    and the body aching and falling apart.

    right now - i feel better - healthwise - than i have in the past couple
    of years, but i still feel like i've got some problems that need
    watching. i know of two more operations that i need. one is scheduled
    for feb 2007. i'm being scheduled for a CPAC study, and i've still got
    an ultra-sound coming up in april to see how long i put off the second
    operation.

    i'm getting off track again - sorry.

    back to the focus of the question - reflecting back..... i think that
    when you are younger, i think that you get the mental state of mind that
    because you are young, you don't have to worry about health issues.

    for example - look at all the people who smoke. they didn't start
    smoking when they were 50 and having breathing problems. they started
    when they thought that it wouldn't hurt them. the same is true about
    drinking. party and party hard.

    and when it comes to sex and aids now. look at all these young people
    who are paying the price for not thinking that they are not going to get
    sick from what they are doing?

    sorry to ramble on..... in my own defense... i have none. i took
    the chance that i felt healthy and because my dad was always healthy,
    felt that it was passed on through the genes. until he developed pca
    and it took his life.

    if anyone who is reading this can profit from my experiences, and i'm
    helping save someone some grief and for that, i posted this response.

    ~ curtis

    knowledge is power - growing old is mandatory - growing wise is optional
    "Many more men die with prostate cancer than of it. Growing old is
    invariably fatal. Prostate cancer is only sometimes so."
    http://community.webtv.net/PALMER_ENT/doc


  13. #13
    Steve Jordan Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    On December 8, Mike Freely wrote in pertinent part about his efforts to
    obtain VA (read: taxpayer-financed) disability money:

    (snip)
    > As a whole it's paid off, but the effort is so daunting and so often
    > fruitless that I've all but dropped my efforts to add another
    > well-warranted (according to an e-mail to me from the national VA
    > director) 10%, which would push me into the 50% zone and the major
    > tax, pay, and care benefits it provides pursuant to Category I status.

    Aw, shucks, poor Mike.

    Lemme see. He has bragged about his athletic ability and physical
    prowess. He has bragged about his decision to "retire" some years ago.
    Now he brags about his ability to obtain *disability* money and related
    benefits. And he wants even more but is not sure that the result would
    be worth the effort.

    Hello? Are any of my brothers and sisters able to comprehend the meaning
    of "hypocrite"? Or "parasite?"

    We taxpayers are financing Mike's windsurfer lifestyle.

    Yes, he is plausible in many of his posts. But I must remind all that
    that does not equal wisdom.

    Regards,

    Steve J

    "There is nothing sadder than the brutal murder of a beautiful theory by
    a gang of ugly facts."
    --Francois, Duc de la Rochefoucauld



  14. #14
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    Bob C. wrote:
    > The VA seems to
    > get publicized promises of financial help from our political leaders,
    > especially when these leaders are asking for public support for the
    > effort, but then something happens and just the opposite happens. They
    > get cuts instead, for this reason or another.


    Oh, the VA got huge funding increases the last few years, but part of
    their problem is that they budget only one year out, and the increased
    demand has long since swamped their extra funding. But the problems I've
    had with them began over 15 years ago and keep recurring, so they can't
    blame them on Iraq.

    > Their letter of determination, or official ruling, should spell out
    > why they ruled how they did. Last page, down at the bottom. From it
    > you hopefully should be able to see what evidence they lack, if that
    > is the case. Battles like yours, none of us need. Whether they rule
    > for or against you, you sure should be told the reasons for their
    > decisions in a timely fashion.


    Yep. But when their own evaluation and the federal head of the VA -- an
    ENT surgeon -- agree with me but the finding shoots me down anyway, and
    they keep charging me for approved service-connected meds despite 6
    years of battling them over that administrative problem, the battle gets
    old. So I just buy my own damn meds at Walmart and hope I don't crack my
    head open falling like a felled tree.

    I agree the service organizations are very impressive; they helped me a
    great deal initially. But for every 10 steps forward through them, VA
    administrative screwups subsequently set us back anywhere from 1 to 9
    steps.

    I wish socialized medicine on no one this side of radical Islam.

    I.P.

  15. #15
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    c palmer wrote:

    > ====> hi I.P. - i don't mind being used as the example. in fact, that
    > is what i've trying to convey - the fact that all my life - i felt ok.
    > if i wanted to do something..... i did. the old saying about you don't
    > realize just how nice it is to have your health - until you don't have
    > it is very true.
    >
    > when i was in service - i always got a healthy report. i guess it just
    > re-inforced my belief that i was doing ok. then, when i got out, my
    > wife had all the health problems and we could only afford the health
    > insurance for her and even that got to be too expensive. but it was
    > understood between us that since i was the healthy one - i would do
    > without the insurance.
    >
    > then at age 51, even though i "felt" ok, i thought i was time to pull
    > into the pit stop and raise the hood to see how things are. so, when i
    > went to the doctor - i specifically ask for a psa test and when i saw on
    > the follow visit - all he told me about my psa test was that is was ok.
    > i was never told a number and i was not aware of just how important the
    > psa numbers were at the time, but learned soon afterwards.
    >
    > but i'm not side stepping your question - how does anyone who doesn't
    > visit a doc from age 40-56 even KNOW whether he has problems cropping
    > up?
    >
    > i would have to say that i tried my best to stay in tuned with my body.
    > if i didn't feel right, i got checked out. it's just that there is a
    > lot of difference in being young and having the cold or flu and
    > everything is ok - elsewhere, than being older and not having the flu
    > and the body aching and falling apart.
    >
    > right now - i feel better - healthwise - than i have in the past couple
    > of years, but i still feel like i've got some problems that need
    > watching. i know of two more operations that i need. one is scheduled
    > for feb 2007. i'm being scheduled for a CPAC study, and i've still got
    > an ultra-sound coming up in april to see how long i put off the second
    > operation.
    >
    > i'm getting off track again - sorry.
    >
    > back to the focus of the question - reflecting back..... i think that
    > when you are younger, i think that you get the mental state of mind that
    > because you are young, you don't have to worry about health issues.
    >
    > for example - look at all the people who smoke. they didn't start
    > smoking when they were 50 and having breathing problems. they started
    > when they thought that it wouldn't hurt them. the same is true about
    > drinking. party and party hard.
    >
    > and when it comes to sex and aids now. look at all these young people
    > who are paying the price for not thinking that they are not going to get
    > sick from what they are doing?
    >
    > sorry to ramble on..... in my own defense... i have none. i took
    > the chance that i felt healthy and because my dad was always healthy,
    > felt that it was passed on through the genes. until he developed pca
    > and it took his life.
    >
    > if anyone who is reading this can profit from my experiences, and i'm
    > helping save someone some grief and for that, i posted this response.


    Exactly why I used your experience as a springboard. I wasn't
    questioning your actions, per se, as much as encouraging others to do as
    you say, not as you did. So MANY common health problems have no symptoms
    at all until they are very serious or even life-threatening that how we
    FEEL makes little difference.

    I.P.

  16. #16
    Mary Fisher Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer


    "c palmer" <PALMER_ENT@webtv.[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > .. the VA
    >
    > Sorry to butt in here but will someone tell me what VA is please?
    > Mary
    >
    > ====> you're not butting in mary. VA stands for Veteran's
    > Administration in america.
    >
    > this is the organization where the veterans have to file claims for any
    > compensation as well as the VA is in charge for the medical care of the
    > veteran.


    Thank you!

    I felt that I might be butting in because I wasn't contributing to the topic
    (I couldn't, having no experience of it!).

    I like learning new things :-)

    Mary



  17. #17
    NICK Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    Mary Fisher wrote:


    > I felt that I might be butting in because I wasn't contributing to the topic
    > (I couldn't, having no experience of it!).


    That's not butting in.

    There may be times you use a term us Yanks aren't familar with and
    will have to ask you. <g>



    > I like learning new things :-)


    We all should. Keeps the gray matter upstairs functioning.


  18. #18
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    I’m very disappointed that, beyond revealing his post to me, no one
    stood up to Steve Jordan’s whining about military pension and disability
    pay.

    Steve wrote:
    > Mike [as he calls me] . . . brags about his ability to obtain
    > *disability* money and related benefits. And he wants even more but
    > is not sure that the result would be worth the effort.
    > Hello? Are any of my brothers and sisters able to comprehend the
    > meaning of "hypocrite"? Or "parasite?"
    > We taxpayers are financing Mike's windsurfer lifestyle.


    So Steve whines about a military vet's $110 net monthly disability pay,
    calls him a hypocrite and a parasite for pursuing another $45 for
    additional service-connected medical problems, cries over his pension
    (60% above Minimum Wage) earned by 20 years in uniform protecting
    Steve's right to whine, and labels informative responses to questions in
    a thread titled “Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate
    cancer “ as “bragging” . . . and no one speaks out?

    Never mind that my service-connected impaired vision, hearing, and
    balance threaten me daily and almost got me killed twice, or that my gym
    time (which I very strongly encourage and try to motivate everyone to
    pursue even though he labels that “bragging”, too) is for reduction of
    my disabilities, not for recreation (it took the staff’s lead trainer
    many weeks to design exercises around my clinically verified pathologies
    to mitigate, rather than exacerbate, their impacts on my life).
    Windsurfing is the only sport I can still pursue with reasonable success
    and acceptable risk, and even it missed killing me by less than one
    second/five feet in 1990 due directly to my service-connected
    disabilities. Would Steve deny disability benefits to a soldier playing
    basketball in his wheelchair, running on artificial legs, or demanding
    to return to combat on an artificial leg? In denigrating my disability
    pay he denigrate theirs, because all disability benefits, whether from
    combat or not, are awarded through the same intense, prolonged,
    verified, expert VA medical scrutiny. And is Steve our official
    retirement manager?

    His carping about military vets goes unchallenged, yet some of you
    expect me to take seriously your criticism of my long posts or how I
    phrase facts? Get some perspective, please.

    Steve should walk a mile in my shoes – without falling backwards into a
    heap of cinder blocks and garden tools or stepping in front of a moving
    car, both of which I have done due to my disabilities – then get back to
    us with his vile sniping at things and people he doesn’t know jack
    about. I surely hope for his wife’s sake he didn’t behave this way his
    whole life, before he surrendered his senses and humanity to ADT.

    I don’t care about the baseless personal nonsense he incessantly spews
    about me; it’s about as threatening and substantive as ghost farts, and
    tells far more about him than about me. If he tries it with a combat
    vet, though, I will send his post and this response to his hometown
    newspaper and to some vet forums. Everyone here should demand he
    apologize to the vets here.

    If Steve’s ad hominem BS is what you want in this forum, folks, just
    keep on encouraging it with your silence.

    I.P.

  19. #19
    Steve Jordan Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    On December 30, Mike Freely, who promised to plonk me (another of his
    lies) wrote:

    > I’m very disappointed that, beyond revealing his post to me, no one
    > stood up to Steve Jordan’s whining about military pension and
    > disability pay.


    There is nothing at all that Mike can write that will cause me to whine.
    As usual, Mikey does precisely what he accuses me of doing.

    As Sam Clemens wrote about someone as to whom he was contemptuous:

    >"His simple word is worthless; and to embellish it with his oath would

    merely make it picturesque, not valuable."

    Regards,

    Steve J

  20. #20
    Alex Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    "Steve Jordan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:qKIeh.153049$[email protected]..
    > On December 8, Mike Freely wrote in pertinent part about his efforts to
    > obtain VA (read: taxpayer-financed) disability money:
    >
    > (snip)
    >> As a whole it's paid off, but the effort is so daunting and so often
    >> fruitless that I've all but dropped my efforts to add another
    >> well-warranted (according to an e-mail to me from the national VA
    >> director) 10%, which would push me into the 50% zone and the major tax,
    >> pay, and care benefits it provides pursuant to Category I status.

    > Aw, shucks, poor Mike.
    >
    > Lemme see. He has bragged about his athletic ability and physical prowess.
    > He has bragged about his decision to "retire" some years ago. Now he brags
    > about his ability to obtain *disability* money and related benefits. And
    > he wants even more but is not sure that the result would be worth the
    > effort.
    >
    > Hello? Are any of my brothers and sisters able to comprehend the meaning
    > of "hypocrite"? Or "parasite?"
    >
    > We taxpayers are financing Mike's windsurfer lifestyle.
    >
    > Yes, he is plausible in many of his posts. But I must remind all that that
    > does not equal wisdom.


    This post tells us nothing about IP, and an awful lot about Steve J. Steve
    has no choice about having PCa, but he sure does about whether to be nasty.
    Why on earth does it bother Steve, or even matter to him, that a fellow
    cancer survivor is able to enjoy some aspects of his life, or receive
    benefits due him?

    Not that it matters a damn, but I'm a lot happier as a taxpayer financing
    the cost of a vet's pension and disability benefits than I am as a purchaser
    of pharmaceuticals financing the 9-figure salaries of drug company CEOs.



  21. #21
    kh Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer


    Steve Jordan wrote:

    > Aw, shucks, poor I.P. <edited>
    >
    > Lemme see. He has bragged about his athletic ability and physical
    > prowess. He has bragged about his decision to "retire" some years ago.
    > Now he brags about his ability to obtain *disability* money and related
    > benefits. And he wants even more but is not sure that the result would
    > be worth the effort.
    >
    > Hello? Are any of my brothers and sisters able to comprehend the meaning
    > of "hypocrite"? Or "parasite?"
    >
    > We taxpayers are financing I.P.'s windsurfer lifestyle. <edited>


    That's not my read.

    Veteran's benefits are not the same as the dole. Government and
    military retirees earned their pension, fair and square. You or I
    might envy them but our envy doesn't make their situation wrong.

    I don't take I.P. as bragging. It's more like putting positive
    whitewash on a bad fence.

    He's bragging about how his incontinence and impotence doesn't matter
    to him when he's windsurfing????

    While I haven't experienced incontinence, 8 months of Lupron left me,
    let's say, less than rock hard. With all those gorgeous, sexy, mature
    women out there, it's frustrating to be so incapable, so
    less-than-pole-like. I never realized that 50, 60 year old women
    could be so attractive. It might be that they have the confidence of
    experience and know how to carry themselves. Donno.

    My last two efforts were on a crumb of Levitra, about 1/3 of a 20 mg.
    As someone advised here, I sucked the crumb rather than swallowed it.
    It took effect in about 15, 20 minutes. The erection was "adequate"
    and lasted about 6 minutes.

    The orgasm was 50% or better. Still room for improvement but not bad.


    One weird thing, it almost felt like an ejaculation. I could feel
    fluid passing in squirts. This was great. Even if it was just my
    imagination, I hope this keeps improving.

    When I, er, take matters into hand, the orgasm isn't as good, there's
    some twitching, and a little fluid seeps out after the fact.

    -kh Who would have thought that women with gray hair, age spots,
    facial lines, would be that attractive?


  22. #22
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    kh wrote:
    > Steve Jordan wrote:
    >> [IP] has bragged about his athletic ability and physical prowess.
    >> He has bragged about his decision to "retire" some years ago.
    >> Now he brags about his ability to obtain *disability* money and related
    >> benefits. And he wants even more but is not sure that the result would
    >> be worth the effort.


    > That's not my read.
    >
    > Veteran's benefits are not the same as the dole. Government and
    > military retirees earned their pension, fair and square. You or I
    > might envy them but our envy doesn't make their situation wrong.
    >
    > I don't take I.P. as bragging. It's more like putting positive
    > whitewash on a bad fence.


    Actually, it's not even that. Any comments Steve jealously labels
    "bragging" were presented specifically as evidence, illustration, and/or
    support for topical responses to others' comments. Steve whines loudly
    and repeatedly when I don't present support, and now whines when I do,
    so guess what: I'm going to continue choosing for myself when and how to
    support my comments. He tries, but he still ain't the boss of me or of
    this forum.

    In the particular case of my disability comments Steve is bawling about,
    you'll notice he "forgot" to include my introductory phrase relating
    them to the thread: "the effort [of obtaining VA disability approval] is
    so daunting and so often fruitless that . . . " His jealousy of my $110
    monthly disability benefit, or another $45 if I ever obtain it, is one
    of the most petty gripes I've ever heard. I'd gladly pay him ten times
    that much to restore my balance, vision, and hearing.

    I don't consider Steve's denial of his ADT SEs "bragging"; he simply
    presents that claim as anecdotal support when he claims ADT SEs are
    largely manageable.

    > He's bragging about how his incontinence and impotence doesn't matter
    > to him when he's windsurfing????


    Jeez . . . is my writing that confusing? I'm TRYING to explain to PC
    newbies choosing treatment that a reasonable level of urinary
    incontinence doesn't have to impede our daily lives, including hard
    physical play or work. How anyone short of Steve could consider that
    "bragging" escapes me. Sure, piss in my wet suit bothers me, but it
    beats the living HELL out of MUSHY CACA in my wet suit, a burning anus,
    disabling fatigue, or most of the other couple of dozen SEs of PC
    treatment. And it is infinitely superior to giving up meaningful
    activities.

    I.P.

  23. #23
    kh Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer


    I.P. Freely wrote:
    ....
    > In the particular case of my disability comments Steve is bawling about,
    > you'll notice he "forgot" to include my introductory phrase relating
    > them to the thread: "the effort [of obtaining VA disability approval] is
    > so daunting and so often fruitless that . . . " His jealousy of my $110
    > monthly disability benefit, or another $45 if I ever obtain it, is one
    > of the most petty gripes I've ever heard. I'd gladly pay him ten times
    > that much to restore my balance, vision, and hearing.


    Well, that's in the area of, talking about stuff that's not going to
    change. I think that's your general point, we were all delt a hand,
    now we play it out as best we can.

    >
    > I don't consider Steve's denial of his ADT SEs "bragging"; he simply
    > presents that claim as anecdotal support when he claims ADT SEs are
    > largely manageable.

    ....

    I've got mixed feelings on Hormones and Androgen blockage. I think I
    could have managed the Lupron if I had gotten monthly blood
    chemistries and knew that my blood sugar was going bad.

    Well, that and the (possibly) osteoporosis and triglycerides, etc.

    Back to the original issue, I don't think anyone is worried about some
    disabled Vet looting the system. No one commented because that idea
    is so foreign that it doesn't register on anyone's consciousness.

    "lemme get this straight, I lose a leg and you pay me a disability
    check?"

    I can see people signing up for that. <said sarcastically>

    Anyone who's ever had an infected toenail, where it hurts to walk for a
    week, cannot comprehend how any disabled Vet could be thought of as
    taking advantage of the system.

    -kh Don't like it? Tell it to Bob Dole or Daniel Inouye.


  24. #24
    Steve Jordan Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    On January 2, Mikey Freely wrote:

    Quoting kh:

    >> I don't take I.P. as bragging. It's more like putting positive
    >> whitewash on a bad fence.


    Mike blathered:

    > Actually, it's not even that. Any comments Steve jealously labels
    > "bragging"


    Ah. Now Mikey is a 'net shrink and can psychoanalyze me. Pitiful.

    (ka-snip)

    > In the particular case of my disability comments Steve is bawling about,
    > you'll notice he "forgot"


    Who is Mikey quoting?

    > to include my introductory phrase relating
    > them to the thread: "the effort [of obtaining VA disability approval] is
    > so daunting and so often fruitless that . . . "


    I assume that my brothers and sisters have read the post to which I
    refer. I forgot nothing, including the fact that Mikey the peaceful soul
    has called me a lying bastard. One more time: he has earned anything I
    choose to toss at him.

    > His jealousy of my $110 monthly disability benefit, or another $45 if I ever obtain it, is one
    > of the most petty gripes I've ever heard.


    More amateur psychoanalysis. Or is it shrinkage?

    Oh, and for those who missed it, Mikey never left the ZI, aka
    continental United States. Whatever he's collecting for was NOT
    sustained in combat.

    (snip)

    > I don't consider Steve's denial of his ADT SEs "bragging"


    Another of the myriad examples of Mikey's practice of simply making up
    allegations to support his theses.

    > he simply presents that claim as anecdotal support when he claims ADT SEs are largely manageable.


    Mikey should know he has been told plenty of times that what I write
    about tx of SEs are not my claims but are what med onc Stephen B. Strum
    writes. But that's an inconvenient fact, and, typically, Mike ignores it.

    (snip yada yada about fecal incontinence, a very rare SE of RT)

    A few months ago a 14-year veteran of the PCa wars, a man who knows more
    about this killer than most medics, who often is asked to counsel
    patients, and who has more knowledge of this disease in his little
    finger than Mike has in his entire head, briefly engaged Mikey in a
    colloquy about it. Having more important things to do as a PCa activist
    and mentor, and concluding that Mike is unreachable and unteachable, he
    gave it up as futile and left.

    THAT, boys and girls, is a loss to everyone here.

    Mikey is unimportant; he rants and raves about his particular and
    peculiar shibboleths and profanely resents anyone who dares to
    present a different view (remember the lying bastard label). He is the
    perfect example of the aphorism that a little knowledge is a dangerous
    thing.

    Someone, and I reckon no one else will do it so I must, should make an
    effort to counterbalance Mike's sometimes silly and ignorant rants. He
    may call me any kind of bastard he wishes, but he will not he can not
    discourage me from helping my brothers and sisters to the extent of my
    ability.

    Regards,

    Steve J

    "Everyone is in favor of free speech. Hardly a day passes without its
    being extolled, but some people's idea of it is that they are free to
    say what they like, but if anyone says anything back, that is an outrage."
    --Sir Winston L. S. Churchill

  25. #25
    kh Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    Steve Jordan wrote:

    > (snip yada yada about fecal incontinence, a very rare SE of RT)


    I expect that most readers realize that's his bte noire, so I
    wouldn't make too much of it.

    Given that, as a rad grad of both IMRT and Pd-103 seeds, I have
    developed an odd potty cycle. When I get up in the morning, it
    frequently takes two good "sit-downs" to clear my plumbing.

    Both are solid and easy, I would say it's a joy but that'd be verging
    on too much information.

    About two or three times a week, I have an afternoon session. This is
    different. It starts with an hour or so of "I gotta go. No, maybe
    not. Yes, I gotta go. No, I don't. YES!"

    I feel like I have to go but if I don't, nothing happens. It's like a
    bunch of false alarms.

    Then, when I do go, it's not like the morning. It's loose, watery.

    Clearly something is going on. It's not horrible but it's not quite
    normal either.

    -kh Once last year, I did cough and accidentally squirted a couple
    drops but THAT is too much information.


  26. #26
    I.P. Freely Guest

    Default Re: Disability Compensation for Agent Orange prostate cancer

    kh wrote:
    > Steve Jordan wrote:
    >
    >> (snip yada yada about fecal incontinence, a very rare SE of RT)

    >
    > I expect that most readers realize that's his bte noire, so I
    > wouldn't make too much of it.


    I had to go look it up:" "something to be avoided". I agree.

    I.P.

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