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Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide
  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48679807/ns/health-mens_health/?__utma=14933801.248047306.1344852214.1344954202.1 345066824.8&__utmb=14933801.2.10.1345066824&__utmc =14933801&__utmx=-&__utmz=14933801.1344852214.1.1.utmcsr=(direct)|ut mccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=14933801.|8=Ear ned%20By=msnbc%7Ccover=1^12=Landing%20Content=Mixe d=1^13=Landing%20Hostname=www.nbcnews.com=1^30=Vis it%20Type%20to%20Content=Earned%20to%20Mixed=1&__u tmk=143839541


    Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients

    Drug helps men after other therapies fail


    By Robert Bazell Chief science and health correspondent
    NBC News


    A new drug helps men with advanced prostate cancer live longer, even
    after they have not been helped by other treatments, researchers
    reported Wednesday. The drug, called enzalutamide, is a pill that
    tackles prostate tumors from several different directions, interfering
    with molecular pathways that help them grow. It does not cause the
    nausea, hair loss and other side effects often associated with
    chemotherapy.

    This is extraordinarily significant, says Dr. Howard Scher of
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, who led the study.

    The results out Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine
    describe a study carried out on almost 1,200 patients in 15 countries.
    All had stopped responding to previous treatments, first with drugs
    that block the hormone testosterone, which can fuel prostate cancer,
    and then with more traditional cell-killing chemotherapy.

    The study found that men taking enzalutamide lived 37 percent longer
    on average. That is the good news.

    The qualifications? The 37 percent comes from comparing men who lived
    on average 18.4 months on the drug to those who lived on average 13.6
    months on placebo. The drug, made by a biotechnology company called
    Medivation is likely to be approved by the Food and Drug
    Administration within a few months and will cost about $6,000 a month.

    Is the $6,000 monthly cost worth it for a survival benefit of slightly
    less than six months?

    If it is you, it certainly is, Scher says. He points out that, as in
    most cancer studies, the average survival rate can be deceiving. Some
    patients get no benefit at all, while others have lived for years on
    the drug.

    This has become a familiar story in cancer research. New directed
    therapies that are hugely expensive prolong life by an average of a
    few months. Almost everyone in the field says our medical system
    cannot afford to pay to treat people with all these new discoveries.

    But with this drug, as with many others, there is hope that it could
    be even more effective if its just used in a smarter way.

    Experiments already are under way to test the drug, in combination
    with another, earlier in the disease. In those tests, doctors are
    trying it in men soon after the cancer spreads out of the prostate to
    the lymph nodes and toward the bones where it becomes
    life-threatening. The hope is such treatment could bring a far more
    profound extension of survival. That will not reduce costs, but it
    would be even more exciting.

    But for now this latest development, despite the caveats, represents a
    huge advance against the second biggest cancer killer of men.

    Prostate cancer kills kills more than 32,000 U.S. men a year. Many
    cases never need treatment but once it starts spreading men are
    treated with radiation, surgery or chemotherapy.

  2. #2
    Alan Meyer Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients-- enzalutamide

    On 08/15/2012 06:47 PM, [email protected] wrote:

    > ... The drug, called enzalutamide ...


    I believe that this is the new trade name for the drug that has gone
    through clinical trials under the name MDV-3100.

    > ... The drug, made by a biotechnology company called
    > Medivation is likely to be approved by the Food and Drug
    > Administration within a few months and will cost about $6,000 a month.
    > ...


    Zytiga is similarly priced.

    I'd be very interested to know what the manufacturing cost is for these
    drugs. I suspect it's a small fraction of the sales price.

    I wish we had a better way to fund medical research and establish
    reasonable prices. There's no question but that the makers of Zytiga
    and Enzalutamide have invested millions, probably hundreds of millions.
    They need to make that money back and also make back the millions
    they've invested in drugs that didn't pan out.

    Still, it's a tough system that makes the cost of insurance very high
    and makes many cancer drugs simply out of reach for the millions of
    uninsured Americans.

    Alan

  3. #3
    Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide

    For more detail, see

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1207506

    If the side effect issues with enzalutamide are as low as with abiraterone,
    then this will make another huge difference to those who wish to get a
    little more time of good quality of life.

    --
    John






    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48679807/ns/health-mens_health/?__utma=14933801.248047306.1344852214.1344954202.1 345066824.8&__utmb=14933801.2.10.1345066824&__utmc =14933801&__utmx=-&__utmz=14933801.1344852214.1.1.utmcsr=(direct)|ut mccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=14933801.|8=Ear ned%20By=msnbc%7Ccover=1^12=Landing%20Content=Mixe d=1^13=Landing%20Hostname=www.nbcnews.com=1^30=Vis it%20Type%20to%20Content=Earned%20to%20Mixed=1&__u tmk=143839541
    >
    >
    > Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients
    >
    > Drug helps men after other therapies fail
    >
    >
    > By Robert Bazell Chief science and health correspondent
    > NBC News
    >
    >
    > A new drug helps men with advanced prostate cancer live longer, even
    > after they have not been helped by other treatments, researchers
    > reported Wednesday. The drug, called enzalutamide, is a pill that
    > tackles prostate tumors from several different directions, interfering
    > with molecular pathways that help them grow. It does not cause the
    > nausea, hair loss and other side effects often associated with
    > chemotherapy.
    >
    > “This is extraordinarily significant,” says Dr. Howard Scher of
    > Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, who led the study.
    >
    > The results out Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine
    > describe a study carried out on almost 1,200 patients in 15 countries.
    > All had stopped responding to previous treatments, first with drugs
    > that block the hormone testosterone, which can fuel prostate cancer,
    > and then with more traditional cell-killing chemotherapy.
    >
    > The study found that men taking enzalutamide lived 37 percent longer
    > on average. That is the good news.
    >
    > The qualifications? The 37 percent comes from comparing men who lived
    > on average 18.4 months on the drug to those who lived on average 13.6
    > months on placebo. The drug, made by a biotechnology company called
    > Medivation is likely to be approved by the Food and Drug
    > Administration within a few months and will cost about $6,000 a month.
    >
    > Is the $6,000 monthly cost worth it for a survival benefit of slightly
    > less than six months?
    >
    > “If it is you, it certainly is,” Scher says. He points out that, as in
    > most cancer studies, the average survival rate can be deceiving. Some
    > patients get no benefit at all, while others have lived for years on
    > the drug.
    >
    > This has become a familiar story in cancer research. New directed
    > therapies that are hugely expensive prolong life by an average of a
    > few months. Almost everyone in the field says our medical system
    > cannot afford to pay to treat people with all these new discoveries.
    >
    > But with this drug, as with many others, there is hope that it could
    > be even more effective if it’s just used in a smarter way.
    >
    > Experiments already are under way to test the drug, in combination
    > with another, earlier in the disease. In those tests, doctors are
    > trying it in men soon after the cancer spreads out of the prostate to
    > the lymph nodes and toward the bones where it becomes
    > life-threatening. The hope is such treatment could bring a far more
    > profound extension of survival. That will not reduce costs, but it
    > would be even more exciting.
    >
    > But for now this latest development, despite the caveats, represents a
    > huge advance against the second biggest cancer killer of men.
    >
    > Prostate cancer kills kills more than 32,000 U.S. men a year. Many
    > cases never need treatment but once it starts spreading men are
    > treated with radiation, surgery or chemotherapy.


  4. #4
    Sue Mullen Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide

    I just checked and enzalutamide is MDV3100, just a new name.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/769167

    Kevin was in the MDV3199 clinical trial for about 2 months. A few days after
    he started it he had a flare, as I recall he ran a temperature and felt a
    bit weak. We went to the ER and they found no infection or other cause for
    the flare and the thinking was that he was getting the real drug. The flare
    lasted a few days and he was ok again.

    He was only in the trial for 2 months because his pain could not be managed
    with the pain meds allowed in the trial. I know when he was taken out of
    the trial he had the usual scans done, but my records don't show what the
    results of the scans were. I think it was about this time I just couldn't
    keep up with my normal record keeping.

    I have no way to be sure, but I think he got into the trial too late for it
    to help him. After the trial he did the Quadromet, targeted radiation, which
    helped the pain and at the same time started taking Keteconozole. With the
    Quadromet his pain went away. In the long run the Keteconozole did not help
    and his cancer became terminal.

    Both abiraterone and MDV3100(enzalutamide) are great drugs and their
    approval came just a little too late for Kevin. I know our med. onc.
    thought both drugs were very good!!

    sue




    wrote in message
    news:[email protected]t...

    For more detail, see

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1207506

    If the side effect issues with enzalutamide are as low as with abiraterone,
    then this will make another huge difference to those who wish to get a
    little more time of good quality of life.

    --
    John






    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48679807/ns/health-mens_health/?__utma=14933801.248047306.1344852214.1344954202.1 345066824.8&__utmb=14933801.2.10.1345066824&__utmc =14933801&__utmx=-&__utmz=14933801.1344852214.1.1.utmcsr=(direct)|ut mccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=14933801.|8=Ear ned%20By=msnbc%7Ccover=1^12=Landing%20Content=Mixe d=1^13=Landing%20Hostname=www.nbcnews.com=1^30=Vis it%20Type%20to%20Content=Earned%20to%20Mixed=1&__u tmk=143839541
    >
    >
    > Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients
    >
    > Drug helps men after other therapies fail
    >
    >
    > By Robert Bazell Chief science and health correspondent
    > NBC News
    >
    >
    > A new drug helps men with advanced prostate cancer live longer, even
    > after they have not been helped by other treatments, researchers
    > reported Wednesday. The drug, called enzalutamide, is a pill that
    > tackles prostate tumors from several different directions, interfering
    > with molecular pathways that help them grow. It does not cause the
    > nausea, hair loss and other side effects often associated with
    > chemotherapy.
    >
    > “This is extraordinarily significant,” says Dr. Howard Scher of
    > Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, who led the study.
    >
    > The results out Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine
    > describe a study carried out on almost 1,200 patients in 15 countries.
    > All had stopped responding to previous treatments, first with drugs
    > that block the hormone testosterone, which can fuel prostate cancer,
    > and then with more traditional cell-killing chemotherapy.
    >
    > The study found that men taking enzalutamide lived 37 percent longer
    > on average. That is the good news.
    >
    > The qualifications? The 37 percent comes from comparing men who lived
    > on average 18.4 months on the drug to those who lived on average 13.6
    > months on placebo. The drug, made by a biotechnology company called
    > Medivation is likely to be approved by the Food and Drug
    > Administration within a few months and will cost about $6,000 a month.
    >
    > Is the $6,000 monthly cost worth it for a survival benefit of slightly
    > less than six months?
    >
    > “If it is you, it certainly is,” Scher says. He points out that, as in
    > most cancer studies, the average survival rate can be deceiving. Some
    > patients get no benefit at all, while others have lived for years on
    > the drug.
    >
    > This has become a familiar story in cancer research. New directed
    > therapies that are hugely expensive prolong life by an average of a
    > few months. Almost everyone in the field says our medical system
    > cannot afford to pay to treat people with all these new discoveries.
    >
    > But with this drug, as with many others, there is hope that it could
    > be even more effective if it’s just used in a smarter way.
    >
    > Experiments already are under way to test the drug, in combination
    > with another, earlier in the disease. In those tests, doctors are
    > trying it in men soon after the cancer spreads out of the prostate to
    > the lymph nodes and toward the bones where it becomes
    > life-threatening. The hope is such treatment could bring a far more
    > profound extension of survival. That will not reduce costs, but it
    > would be even more exciting.
    >
    > But for now this latest development, despite the caveats, represents a
    > huge advance against the second biggest cancer killer of men.
    >
    > Prostate cancer kills kills more than 32,000 U.S. men a year. Many
    > cases never need treatment but once it starts spreading men are
    > treated with radiation, surgery or chemotherapy.



  5. #5
    colin Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide

    Alan I do not, think Johnson and Johnson spent much on researching
    this drug, other than this sounds good lets own it.

    Cancer research uk is a charity
    source Wilkipedia
    This drug was discovered by Gerry Potter in 1990 at the Cancer
    Research UK Centre for Cancer Therapeutics[13] within the Institute of
    Cancer Research in London. Rights for commercialisation of the drug
    were assigned to BTG plc, a UK company that manages commercialisation
    activity in pharmaceuticals. BTG then licenced the product to Cougar
    Biotechnology which began development of the commercial product.[14]
    In 2009, Cougar was acquired by Johnson & Johnson which developed and
    sells the commercial product, and is conducting ongoing clinical
    trials to expand its clinical uses.[15]

    gerry potter also discovered salvestrols, do they work ?


    On Sat, 18 Aug 2012 15:29:48 -0400, Alan Meyer <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 08/15/2012 06:47 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> ... The drug, called enzalutamide ...

    >
    >I believe that this is the new trade name for the drug that has gone
    >through clinical trials under the name MDV-3100.
    >
    >> ... The drug, made by a biotechnology company called
    >> Medivation is likely to be approved by the Food and Drug
    >> Administration within a few months and will cost about $6,000 a month.
    >> ...

    >
    >Zytiga is similarly priced.
    >
    >I'd be very interested to know what the manufacturing cost is for these
    >drugs. I suspect it's a small fraction of the sales price.
    >
    >I wish we had a better way to fund medical research and establish
    >reasonable prices. There's no question but that the makers of Zytiga
    >and Enzalutamide have invested millions, probably hundreds of millions.
    > They need to make that money back and also make back the millions
    >they've invested in drugs that didn't pan out.
    >
    >Still, it's a tough system that makes the cost of insurance very high
    >and makes many cancer drugs simply out of reach for the millions of
    >uninsured Americans.
    >
    > Alan


  6. #6
    colin Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide


    it seems from this post that gerry potter became unwell

    RE: Salvestrol and Prostate Cancer
    by gerrypotter on Sat Mar 10, 2012 12:47 AM

    Quote | Reply We never had the chance to look at leukaemias properly
    because all my research grants were cut ! Shortly after discovering
    salvestrols all my grants from the main UK charities and government
    were axed which prevented me from doing any further work within the
    UK. All the current research is carried on outside the UK.

    When I worked on developing new pharmaceutical products that could be
    protected by patents I was the star of the show in cancer drug
    discovery. As soon as I found natural compounds which were actually
    better than anything the pharmaceutical industry has to offer, the
    situation changed drastically. I tried to get CRUK and EPSRC
    interested in salvestrols but they said they were not interested
    because there is no patent. These are natural compounds already known
    to the wider scientific world that cannot be patented for cancer
    therapy. Therefore they were not interested in them since the
    pharmaceutical indutry would not develop them. The reason that they
    would not develop them would be that they would have to spend millions
    of bucks on clinical trials, only to see a copycat version appear more
    cheaply. So they could not charge an inflated price for them as they
    do for patented medicine, and they would not be profitable enough
    without patent protection. So I can see where they are coming from.

    But the next bit got really scarey. In 2004, shortly after salvestrols
    were launched on the market, two representatives from the UK national
    cancer charity CRUK came to see me and threatened me !!! They said
    "Gerry, take this salvestrol product off the market or we will ruin
    your reputation as a scientist" This is the absolute truth. I was
    gobsmacked to say the least and I muttered something about "Let me
    worry about my reputation and you should worry about yours".

    A month later 5 police officers came to my house. I opened the door
    and they forced their way in pushing me up against the wall like a
    criminal. Two of them had riot helmets on !

    They handcuffed me and bundled me into the back of a police van and
    kept me in a cell for 8 hours. They then transferred me to a secure
    unit of a psychiatric ward in a mental hospital, where they
    overpowered me stripped off my clothes and forcibly injected me with
    chlozopine! I have only recently been released so I have to watch what
    I say so that nobodys reputation gets tarnished ! Dont be surprised if
    I cant reply anymore since most of my replies are censored anyway so
    you probably will never read this.

    So there is a bitter side to salvestrols, but not what you expected to
    hear. I am still under close observation and have to return for
    monthly depo injections to keep me "under control" from saying too
    much, whoops.



    On Sat, 18 Aug 2012 15:29:48 -0400, Alan Meyer <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 08/15/2012 06:47 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> ... The drug, called enzalutamide ...

    >
    >I believe that this is the new trade name for the drug that has gone
    >through clinical trials under the name MDV-3100.
    >
    >> ... The drug, made by a biotechnology company called
    >> Medivation is likely to be approved by the Food and Drug
    >> Administration within a few months and will cost about $6,000 a month.
    >> ...

    >
    >Zytiga is similarly priced.
    >
    >I'd be very interested to know what the manufacturing cost is for these
    >drugs. I suspect it's a small fraction of the sales price.
    >
    >I wish we had a better way to fund medical research and establish
    >reasonable prices. There's no question but that the makers of Zytiga
    >and Enzalutamide have invested millions, probably hundreds of millions.
    > They need to make that money back and also make back the millions
    >they've invested in drugs that didn't pan out.
    >
    >Still, it's a tough system that makes the cost of insurance very high
    >and makes many cancer drugs simply out of reach for the millions of
    >uninsured Americans.
    >
    > Alan


  7. #7
    Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide

    colin <[email protected]> wrote:
    > it seems from this post that gerry potter became unwell


    This dramatic story had me researching.

    Early in 2012, it seems that Gerry was responding regularly to questions
    about Salvestrol until he announced, on May 11th, 2012, that he was being
    prevented from continuing his contributions to the particular noticeboard,
    and they duly ceased.

    The forum topic, to which Gerry made his first of many contributions on
    January 25th, is to be found here:

    http://www.cancercompass.com/message...ll,50825,0.htm

    What comes across in Gerry's contributions is a remarkably confident
    'all-knowing' series of assertions about the intensely complex genomics of
    cancer. Establishing exactly what is going on is a massive and painstaking
    task and perhaps Gerry and others have been able to do all the necessary
    work. In which case he ought to be 'listened to' very carefully.

    Then I found something from a Leicester newspaper (Gerry was based in
    Leicester at the time) which revealed that Gerry is bipolar and, as is well
    known, stress can drive sufferers to the point where they need protection
    from themselves. The reference is

    http://www.thisisleicestershire.co.u...ail/story.html

    As someone who is depending on Gerry's 'child', abiraterone, and who
    expects its effectiveness to end fairly soon, I need to get to the bottom
    of the Salvestrol story. I also need to seek clarification from my
    oncologist.

    --
    John

  8. #8
    colin Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide

    H John looked at the thisleicester post what a story,
    no mention of saverstrol, it is illegal to claim a cancer cure
    unless all the clinical trials have been done,
    I have read a lot of his cancercompass contributions,
    I wonder if he was stopped from doing it because of the stress
    it was causing him, as he answered so many questions.

    how frustrating to make such a discovery, and have to wait 20 years
    for it to be approved, if the big drug companys had left it alone
    would it have been more affordable.
    As for salvestrol Gerry seems to believe in it, and he has good
    credentials, I am tempted to get some,

    his story is a bit like John Nash



    ,invalid.invalid> wrote:

    >colin <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> it seems from this post that gerry potter became unwell

    >
    >This dramatic story had me researching.
    >
    >Early in 2012, it seems that Gerry was responding regularly to questions
    >about Salvestrol until he announced, on May 11th, 2012, that he was being
    >prevented from continuing his contributions to the particular noticeboard,
    >and they duly ceased.
    >
    >The forum topic, to which Gerry made his first of many contributions on
    >January 25th, is to be found here:
    >
    >http://www.cancercompass.com/message...ll,50825,0.htm
    >
    >What comes across in Gerry's contributions is a remarkably confident
    >'all-knowing' series of assertions about the intensely complex genomics of
    >cancer. Establishing exactly what is going on is a massive and painstaking
    >task and perhaps Gerry and others have been able to do all the necessary
    >work. In which case he ought to be 'listened to' very carefully.
    >
    >Then I found something from a Leicester newspaper (Gerry was based in
    >Leicester at the time) which revealed that Gerry is bipolar and, as is well
    >known, stress can drive sufferers to the point where they need protection
    >from themselves. The reference is
    >
    >http://www.thisisleicestershire.co.u...ail/story.html
    >
    >As someone who is depending on Gerry's 'child', abiraterone, and who
    >expects its effectiveness to end fairly soon, I need to get to the bottom
    >of the Salvestrol story. I also need to seek clarification from my
    >oncologist.


  9. #9
    colin Guest

    Default Re: Experimental pill adds months to lives of prostate cancer patients -- enzalutamide

    Hi John
    Found Gerry on
    http://naturalhealthmagazinenewslett...lvestrols-yet/
    posting around the same time as the other site.
    He seems to be on Facebook on 8th august gerry.potter.52

    On Tue, 21 Aug 2012 02:49:16 -0500, <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >colin <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> it seems from this post that gerry potter became unwell

    >
    >This dramatic story had me researching.
    >
    >Early in 2012, it seems that Gerry was responding regularly to questions
    >about Salvestrol until he announced, on May 11th, 2012, that he was being
    >prevented from continuing his contributions to the particular noticeboard,
    >and they duly ceased.
    >
    >The forum topic, to which Gerry made his first of many contributions on
    >January 25th, is to be found here:
    >
    >http://www.cancercompass.com/message...ll,50825,0.htm
    >
    >What comes across in Gerry's contributions is a remarkably confident
    >'all-knowing' series of assertions about the intensely complex genomics of
    >cancer. Establishing exactly what is going on is a massive and painstaking
    >task and perhaps Gerry and others have been able to do all the necessary
    >work. In which case he ought to be 'listened to' very carefully.
    >
    >Then I found something from a Leicester newspaper (Gerry was based in
    >Leicester at the time) which revealed that Gerry is bipolar and, as is well
    >known, stress can drive sufferers to the point where they need protection
    >from themselves. The reference is
    >
    >http://www.thisisleicestershire.co.u...ail/story.html
    >
    >As someone who is depending on Gerry's 'child', abiraterone, and who
    >expects its effectiveness to end fairly soon, I need to get to the bottom
    >of the Salvestrol story. I also need to seek clarification from my
    >oncologist.


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