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Alternatives for Lyrica?
  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Alternatives for Lyrica?

    I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet. Seems to
    help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare on September 1st,
    and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is one that's through the roof for
    me. Are there any alternatives to Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?

    x-no-archive: yes

    On 8/21/2012 4:56 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet. Seems to
    > help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare on September 1st,
    > and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is one that's through the roof for
    > me. Are there any alternatives to Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks.


    If your goal is to reverse the nerve damage causing your neuropathies
    and if your PN is due to diabetes, the most effective route is typically
    tight glucose control by restricting carbs enough to keep bg as close to
    100 as possible at all times and to take the supplement alpha lipoic
    acid, an antioxidant and insulin sensitizer proven to reverse diabetic
    neuropathy.

    I had extremely painful PNs years ago and the pain went away as soon as
    I low carbed, and alpha lipoic acid got rid of the remaining residual
    numbness.

    Susan

  3. #3
    mainframetech Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?

    On Aug 21, 4:56*pm, rfd...@optonline.net wrote:
    > I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet. Seemsto
    > help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare on September 1st,
    > and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is one that's through the roof for
    > me. Are there any alternatives to Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks..


    The patent for Lyrica doesn't eun out until October 2013. And then
    there might be some time before a generic comes out.

    Chris

  4. #4
    mainframetech Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?

    On Aug 21, 4:56*pm, rfd...@optonline.net wrote:
    > I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet. Seemsto
    > help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare on September 1st,
    > and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is one that's through the roof for
    > me. Are there any alternatives to Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks..


    Oops! I forgot to ask if you used statins. That is a symptom for
    them at times. If so, the warnings say stop taking the statin
    immediately and tell your doctor.

    Chris

  5. #5
    mainframetech Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?

    On Aug 21, 4:56*pm, rfd...@optonline.net wrote:
    > I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet. Seemsto
    > help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare on September 1st,
    > and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is one that's through the roof for
    > me. Are there any alternatives to Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks..


    The patent for Lyrica doesn't eun out until October 2013. And
    then
    there might be some time before a generic comes out.

    I also have to ask if you use statins. That is a symptom for
    them at times. If so, the warnings say stop taking the statin
    immediately and tell your doctor.

    Chris

  6. #6
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?


    <rfdjr1@optonline.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet. Seems
    > to
    > help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare on September
    > 1st,
    > and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is one that's through the
    > roof for
    > me. Are there any alternatives to Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks.


    I wouldn't personally take Lyrcia even if it were free.

    Have you tried keeping your BG in normal range? That is what really seems
    to help me. I also take Evening Primrose Oil, 2,000 mg daily in split
    doses. And Alpha Lopoeic Acid.



  7. #7
    GysdeJongh Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet.
    > Seems to help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare
    > on September 1st, and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is
    > one that's through the roof for me. Are there any alternatives to
    > Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks.


    Hi,
    I was diagnosed T2 in 2005 and have neuropathy in my hands and feet. I used
    both Lyrica and Tramadol at the highest dose in combination with one or more
    of these supplements : Alpha Lipoic Acid, Evening Primrose Oil, Vitamin D,
    Vitamin E, capsaicin pads for about 5 years. I did not notice any effect on
    the pain.

    I was on a very low carbohydrate diet for the same time. This lowered my
    HbA1c and fasting glucose within about 1 month. After about 1 year all my
    lipid values started to move in the wrong direction. I did not notice any
    effect on the pain.

    In 2010 I dropped all the meds and supps. I also changed my very low
    carbohydrate diet for a plant based, low calorie, high fiber diet. I do all
    the cooking myself and only use fresh organic type produce. I stay physical
    active by traveling on my bike and looking after my granddaughters. My last
    HbA1c was 5.4% my lipid panel improved to the point where I'm nolonger at
    risk for heart attacks. My neuropathy is less and more tolerable now than in
    the past on pain killers, supplements and a very low carbohydrate diet.

    My neuropathy gets much worse immediately after eating too much, be it
    carbohydrate or fat. I saw another guy here who reported that his neuropathy
    got worse after indulging on walnuts (too much fat)

    There are reports where neuropathy is adversely influenced by too much
    triglycerides and NEFA (both fat substances) in serum. See below for the
    latest abstract.

    So, I guess you have to find out what has the worst effect on your kind of
    neuropathy : a high fat or a high carbohydrate diet. I also included a free
    to read and recent summary of the therapeutic options that do and don't work
    for neuropathy.

    hth
    Gys



    <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3100130/>

    Neurology. 2011 May 17;76(20):1758-65. Epub 2011 Apr 11.
    Evidence-based guideline: Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy: report
    of the American Academy of Neurology, the American Association of
    Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine, and the American Academy of
    Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a scientifically sound and clinically relevant
    evidence-based guideline for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy
    (PDN). METHODS: We performed a systematic review of the literature from 1960
    to August 2008 and classified the studies according to the American Academy
    of Neurology classification of evidence scheme for a therapeutic article,
    and recommendations were linked to the strength of the evidence. The basic
    question asked was: "What is the efficacy of a given treatment
    (pharmacologic: anticonvulsants, antidepressants, opioids, others; and
    nonpharmacologic: electrical stimulation, magnetic field treatment,
    low-intensity laser treatment, Reiki massage, others) to reduce pain and
    improve physical function and quality of life (QOL) in patients with PDN?"
    Results and Recommendations: Pregabalin is established as effective and
    should be offered for relief of PDN (Level A). Venlafaxine, duloxetine,
    amitriptyline, gabapentin, valproate, opioids (morphine sulfate, tramadol,
    and oxycodone controlled-release), and capsaicin are probably effective and
    should be considered for treatment of PDN (Level B). Other treatments have
    less robust evidence or the evidence is negative. Effective treatments for
    PDN are available, but many have side effects that limit their usefulness,
    and few studies have sufficient information on treatment effects on function
    and QOL.
    PMID: 21482920


    Free Radic Biol Med. 2012 Apr 15;52(8):1255-63.
    Triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acids, and prediabetic neuropathy: role
    for oxidative-nitrosative stress.

    Peripheral neuropathy develops in human subjects with prediabetes and
    metabolic syndrome before overt hyperglycemia. The contributions of impaired
    glucose tolerance and insulin signaling, hypertriglyceridemia and/or
    increased nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and hypercholesterolemia to this
    condition remain unknown. Niacin and its derivatives alleviate dyslipidemia
    with a minor effect on glucose homeostasis. This study evaluated the roles
    of impaired glucose tolerance versus dyslipidemia in prediabetic neuropathy
    using Zucker fatty (fa/fa) rats and the niacin derivative acipimox, as well
    as the interplay of hypertriglyceridemia, increased NEFA, and
    oxidative-nitrosative stress. Sixteen-week-old Zucker fatty rats with
    impaired glucose tolerance, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia,
    hypercholesterolemia, and increased NEFA displayed sensory nerve conduction
    velocity deficit, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, and tactile allodynia.
    Acipimox (100 mg kg(-1) day(-1), 4 weeks) reduced serum insulin, NEFA, and
    triglyceride concentrations without affecting glucose tolerance and
    hypercholesterolemia. It alleviated sensory nerve conduction velocity
    deficit and changes in behavioral measures of sensory function and corrected
    oxidative-nitrosative stress, but not impaired insulin signaling, in
    peripheral nerve. Elevated NEFA increased total and mitochondrial superoxide
    production and NAD(P)H oxidase activity in cultured human Schwann cells. In
    conclusion, hypertriglyceridemia and/or increased NEFA concentrations cause
    prediabetic neuropathy through oxidative-nitrosative stress. Lipid-lowering
    agents and antioxidants may find a use in the management of this condition.
    PMID: 22366714



  8. #8
    Dick Ballard Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?

    Neurontin (Gabapentin) is an older drug in the same class, and should
    be much cheaper.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabapentine (their spelling)

    On that page, under the heading Related Drugs:

    "...Compared to gabapentin, pregabalin [Lyrica] is more potent,
    absorbs faster and has greater bioavailability. ..."

    Dick


    On Tue, 21 Aug 2012 16:56:40 -0400, [email protected] wrote:

    >I've been on Lyrica for about a year now for neuropathy in my feet. Seems to
    >help but it's not completely effective. I start on Medicare on September 1st,
    >and I've been checking drug prices and Lyrica is one that's through the roof for
    >me. Are there any alternatives to Lyrica which might be effective? Thanks.


  9. #9
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Alternatives for Lyrica?


    "Dick Ballard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Neurontin (Gabapentin) is an older drug in the same class, and should
    > be much cheaper.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabapentine (their spelling)
    >
    > On that page, under the heading Related Drugs:
    >
    > "...Compared to gabapentin, pregabalin [Lyrica] is more potent,
    > absorbs faster and has greater bioavailability. ..."
    >
    > Dick


    I would NEVER recommend this stuff to anyone! It can lead to suicide. Gave
    me the worst drug trips I ever had. Nasty, nasty stuff. Did nothing for
    the pain but did make me want to jump out the window.



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