Results 1 to 36 of 36
Can Metformin cause liver damage?
  1. #1
    Albert Guest

    Default Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Question,

    At the present time I am taking 1500 mg of Metformin HCL daily for
    type 2 diabetes. My doctor just inform me that I am showing some liver
    irregularities in my last checkup.

    While on another NG not related to diabetes there was a thread started
    by some diabetics concerning their illness and their treatment
    regiment and one of the posters mentioned that he had chosen not to
    use Metformin for his type 2 diabetes instead is doctor put him on an
    insulin regiment. His doctor counseled him that the Metformin's
    possible side effects was liver damage.

    My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin is the culprit
    causing my liver problems?
    -
    Albert

  2. #2
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    x-no-archive: yes

    Albert wrote:
    > Question,
    >
    > At the present time I am taking 1500 mg of Metformin HCL daily for
    > type 2 diabetes. My doctor just inform me that I am showing some liver
    > irregularities in my last checkup.
    >
    > While on another NG not related to diabetes there was a thread started
    > by some diabetics concerning their illness and their treatment
    > regiment and one of the posters mentioned that he had chosen not to
    > use Metformin for his type 2 diabetes instead is doctor put him on an
    > insulin regiment. His doctor counseled him that the Metformin's
    > possible side effects was liver damage.
    >
    > My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin is the culprit
    > causing my liver problems?
    > -
    > Albert


    It is possible. I had elevated liver enzymes during the period I was on
    metformin and haven't had them since.

    Susan

  3. #3
    BJ in Texas Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Albert <[email protected]> wrote:
    || Question,
    ||
    || At the present time I am taking 1500 mg of Metformin HCL
    || daily for type 2 diabetes. My doctor just inform me that I am
    || showing some liver irregularities in my last checkup.
    ||
    || While on another NG not related to diabetes there was a
    || thread started by some diabetics concerning their illness and
    || their treatment regiment and one of the posters mentioned
    || that he had chosen not to use Metformin for his type 2
    || diabetes instead is doctor put him on an insulin regiment.
    || His doctor counseled him that the Metformin's possible side
    || effects was liver damage.
    ||
    || My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin is the
    || culprit causing my liver problems?
    || -
    || Albert

    In rare cases Metformin has been shown to cause liver
    damage especially if combined with excessive or binge
    alcohol consumption.

    BJ
    --
    --
    "Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength." -- Eric
    Hoffer

    Glory, glory the world is saved by the Democrats. They promise
    to be just as honest and bipartisan as they were before the 1994
    elections.










  4. #4
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 17:32:31 GMT, "BJ in Texas"
    <n[email protected]> wrote:

    >|| My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin is the
    >|| culprit causing my liver problems?
    >|| -
    >|| Albert
    >
    >In rare cases Metformin has been shown to cause liver
    >damage especially if combined with excessive or binge
    >alcohol consumption.
    >
    >BJ
    >--


    Luckily the consumption of alcohol doesn't apply here. I have read in
    the side effects that if you do have liver problems you should inform
    your doctor. So I guess there must be some connection.

    Thanks for the prompt reply.
    -
    Albert

  5. #5
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 13:38:02 -0400, Susan <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >> My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin is the culprit
    >> causing my liver problems?
    >> -
    >> Albert

    >
    >It is possible. I had elevated liver enzymes during the period I was on
    >metformin and haven't had them since.
    >
    >Susan


    I really appreciate your quick reply and sharing your personal
    experience. I will point out all of the information I receive here to
    my doctor next time I see him.

    Thank you,
    -
    Albert

  6. #6
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 12:17:48 -0600, Albert <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 13:38:02 -0400, Susan <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin is the culprit
    >>> causing my liver problems?
    >>> -
    >>> Albert

    >>
    >>It is possible. I had elevated liver enzymes during the period I was on
    >>metformin and haven't had them since.
    >>
    >>Susan

    >
    >I really appreciate your quick reply and sharing your personal
    >experience. I will point out all of the information I receive here to
    >my doctor next time I see him.
    >
    >Thank you,
    >-
    >Albert


    Susan,

    I was telling my wife what you said and she asked what now seems an
    obvious question and I didn't think of it. If it's not too personal a
    question, what type of treatment are you using instead of the
    Metformin?
    -
    Albert

  7. #7
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Albert wrote:
    > On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 12:17:48 -0600, Albert

    <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 13:38:02 -0400, Susan

    <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>> My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin

    is the
    >>>> culprit causing my liver problems?
    >>>> -
    >>>> Albert
    >>>
    >>>It is possible. I had elevated liver enzymes during the

    period I
    >>>was on metformin and haven't had them since.
    >>>
    >>>Susan

    >>
    >>I really appreciate your quick reply and sharing your

    personal
    >>experience. I will point out all of the information I

    receive here to
    >>my doctor next time I see him.
    >>
    >>Thank you,
    >>-
    >>Albert

    >
    > Susan,
    >
    > I was telling my wife what you said and she asked what now

    seems an
    > obvious question and I didn't think of it. If it's not

    too personal a
    > question, what type of treatment are you using instead of

    the
    > Metformin?
    > -
    > Albert


    I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a combination
    of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss is
    one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance and
    therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds like
    Metformin.


  8. #8
    Jon Kaplan Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Ozgirl wrote:
    > Albert wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 12:17:48 -0600, Albert

    >
    > <[email protected]>
    >
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 13:38:02 -0400, Susan

    >
    > <[email protected]>
    >
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>>My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin

    >
    > is the
    >
    >>>>>culprit causing my liver problems?
    >>>>>-
    >>>>>Albert
    >>>>
    >>>>It is possible. I had elevated liver enzymes during the

    >
    > period I
    >
    >>>>was on metformin and haven't had them since.
    >>>>
    >>>>Susan
    >>>
    >>>I really appreciate your quick reply and sharing your

    >
    > personal
    >
    >>>experience. I will point out all of the information I

    >
    > receive here to
    >
    >>>my doctor next time I see him.
    >>>
    >>>Thank you,
    >>>-
    >>>Albert

    >>
    >>Susan,
    >>
    >>I was telling my wife what you said and she asked what now

    >
    > seems an
    >
    >>obvious question and I didn't think of it. If it's not

    >
    > too personal a
    >
    >>question, what type of treatment are you using instead of

    >
    > the
    >
    >>Metformin?
    >>-
    >>Albert

    >
    >
    > I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a combination
    > of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss is
    > one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance and
    > therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds like
    > Metformin.
    >


    Other possible alternatives are Actos and Avandia.

    Jon

  9. #9
    Larry Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Mar 23, 1:13�pm, "Ozgirl" <are_we_there_...@maccas.com> wrote:
    > Albert wrote:
    > > On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 12:17:48 -0600, Albert

    >
    > <amla...@hotmail.com>> wrote:
    >
    > >>On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 13:38:02 -0400, Susan

    >
    > <neverm...@nomail.com>
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >>wrote:

    >
    > >>>> My question is, is it a possibility that the Metformin

    > is the
    > >>>> culprit causing my liver problems?
    > >>>> -
    > >>>> Albert

    >
    > >>>It is possible. *I had elevated liver enzymes during the

    > period I
    > >>>was on metformin and haven't had them since.

    >
    > >>>Susan

    >
    > >>I really appreciate your quick reply and sharing your

    > personal
    > >>experience. I will point out all of the information I

    > receive here to
    > >>my doctor next time I see him.

    >
    > >>Thank you,
    > >>-
    > >>Albert

    >
    > > Susan,

    >
    > > I was telling my wife what you said and she asked what now

    > seems an
    > > obvious question and I didn't think of it. *If it's not

    > too personal a
    > > question, what type of treatment are you using instead of

    > the
    > > Metformin?
    > > -
    > > Albert

    >
    > I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a combination
    > of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss is
    > one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance and
    > therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds like
    > Metformin.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Ozgirl: Weight loss MAY BE one of the best things to reduce insulin
    resistance in many T2s. Furthermore IR may not be the primary culprit
    in some T2s. As you know some T2s are not and never have been
    overweight.

    Larry


  10. #10
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 07:13:52 +1100, "Ozgirl"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    snipped for space

    >> Susan,
    >>
    >> I was telling my wife what you said and she asked what now

    >seems an
    >> obvious question and I didn't think of it. If it's not

    >too personal a
    >> question, what type of treatment are you using instead of

    >the
    >> Metformin?
    >> -
    >> Albert

    >
    >I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a combination
    >of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss is
    >one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance and
    >therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds like
    >Metformin.


    Well, I am 72, 6 feet 1 1/2" and weigh 172 pounds so I don't think
    that weight loss is an option for me. I have never weighed over 185
    pounds except after having recuperated from a burst appendix about 40
    years ago then I gained weight like mad and then lost it within a year
    and a half. Right now my A1 C (I think that's what it's called) is
    6.2 and I'm not so much worried about the blood sugar as I am the
    liver problem.

    But thank you for the feedback,
    -
    Albert

  11. #11
    Alan S Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On 23 Mar 2007 15:30:39 -0700, "Larry" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > It is a fact that 80% of obese non diabetics are IR.


    It sounds possible - but is it a fact? Do you have some
    support for that?

    Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    d&e, metformin 1000mg, ezetrol 10mg
    Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
    --
    http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/
    http://loraltravel.blogspot.com/
    latest: Epidaurus

  12. #12
    Larry Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Mar 23, 3:17�pm, Albert <amla...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 07:13:52 +1100, "Ozgirl"
    >
    > <are_we_there_...@maccas.com> wrote:
    >
    > snipped for space
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >> Susan,

    >
    > >> I was telling my wife what you said and she asked what now

    > >seems an
    > >> obvious question and I didn't think of it. *If it's not

    > >too personal a
    > >> question, what type of treatment are you using instead of

    > >the
    > >> Metformin?
    > >> -
    > >> Albert

    >
    > >I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a combination
    > >of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss is
    > >one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance and
    > >therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds like
    > >Metformin.

    >
    > Well, I am 72, 6 feet 1 1/2" and weigh 172 pounds so I don't think
    > that weight loss is an option for me. *I have never weighed over 185
    > pounds except after having recuperated from a burst appendix about 40
    > years ago then I gained weight like mad and then lost it within a year
    > and a half. *Right now my A1 C (I think that's what it's called) is
    > 6.2 and I'm not so much worried about the blood sugar as I am the
    > liver problem.
    >
    > But thank you for the feedback,
    > -
    > Albert- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Albert: I agree with you. It is a fact that 80% of obese non diabetics
    are IR. I would not be taking metformin to just to safeguard you
    against IR particularly if it is determined that you are not presently
    IR by specific tests and that you are not overweight! Your lipid
    profile may suggest if you are IR or not. Even if you are not
    overweight, a very high LDL (dyslipidemia) may warrant taking
    metformin as a T2. Otherwise metformin is a pretty safe drug as it has
    been around for many years with a proven track record.

    Larry


  13. #13
    Loretta Eisenberg Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Practically every medication goes through the liver so it would be hard
    to say if it was the metformin, are you on any statins. What does your
    doctor say.

    Loretta

    --
    In tribute to the United States of America and the State
    of Israel, two bastions of strength in a world filled with strife and
    terrorism.


  14. #14
    Larry Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Mar 23, 3:34?pm, Alan S <loralgtweightandca...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On 23 Mar 2007 15:30:39 -0700, "Larry" <boelk...@aol.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > It is a fact that 80% of obese non diabetics are IR.

    >
    > It sounds possible - but is it a fact? Do you have some
    > support for that?
    >
    > Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    > d&e, metformin 1000mg, ezetrol 10mg
    > Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
    > --http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/http://loraltravel.blogspot.com/
    > latest: Epidaurus


    Alan: I am surprised you don't know that fact. I'll have to dig it up
    but believe me it is a clinical fact that 80% of obese non-diabetic
    individuals are IR. If you think about it, IR is not the sole
    component that T2s must have to be diagnosed. Therefore IR obese
    individuals will not necessarily develope diabetes. Hence it also
    stands to reason that some T2 individuals may have other factors more
    important than IR.

    Larry


  15. #15
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 21:51:44 GMT, Jon Kaplan <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >>
    >> I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a combination
    >> of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss is
    >> one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance and
    >> therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds like
    >> Metformin.
    >>

    >
    >Other possible alternatives are Actos and Avandia.
    >
    >Jon


    Thank you for the heads-up.
    -
    Albert

  16. #16
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On 23 Mar 2007 15:30:39 -0700, "Larry" <[email protected]> wrote:

    snipped for space

    >> Albert- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >Albert: I agree with you. It is a fact that 80% of obese non diabetics
    >are IR. I would not be taking metformin to just to safeguard you
    >against IR particularly if it is determined that you are not presently
    >IR by specific tests and that you are not overweight! Your lipid
    >profile may suggest if you are IR or not. Even if you are not
    >overweight, a very high LDL (dyslipidemia) may warrant taking
    >metformin as a T2. Otherwise metformin is a pretty safe drug as it has
    >been around for many years with a proven track record.
    >
    >Larry


    Larry,

    I can see right now that you are using terminology that is way over
    my head (G). I just got off the phone with the pharmacist and he told
    me that the Lovastatin I am taking is a good candidate for the liver
    problems. I had complained to the doctor this week because I was
    having a problem with short-term memory since I had been taking the
    Lovastatin. He took me off of it substituting it with another
    cholesterol medication but didn't mention that it could of been the
    reason for the liver problems. So maybe the Metformin is not the
    culprit, after all I have been taking the Metformin almost 10 years
    with no problems other than having to increase the dosage I'm taking.
    The pharmacist also told me that the medication he substituted the
    Lovastatin with "could" cause the same problem but far less likely.
    -
    Albert

  17. #17
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 18:49:17 -0400, [email protected] (Loretta
    Eisenberg) wrote:

    >Practically every medication goes through the liver so it would be hard
    >to say if it was the metformin, are you on any statins. What does your
    >doctor say.
    >
    >Loretta


    Loretta,

    I apologize for not catching you post sooner. And yes I have been
    taking Lovastatin this past year. As I said in a later post on this
    thread that the doctor had taken me off of it and substituted it with
    another medication. I also just found out from the pharmacist that it
    could be the cause of the liver problems but my doctor didn't mention
    that the Lovastatin could be causing the liver problems when he
    stopped it. It gets curiouser and curiouser <:>).
    -
    Albert

  18. #18
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Albert wrote:
    > On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 18:49:17 -0400, [email protected]

    (Loretta
    > Eisenberg) wrote:
    >
    >>Practically every medication goes through the liver so it

    would be
    >>hard to say if it was the metformin, are you on any

    statins. What
    >>does your doctor say.
    >>
    >>Loretta

    >
    > Loretta,
    >
    > I apologize for not catching you post sooner. And yes I

    have been
    > taking Lovastatin this past year. As I said in a later

    post on this
    > thread that the doctor had taken me off of it and

    substituted it with
    > another medication. I also just found out from the

    pharmacist that it
    > could be the cause of the liver problems but my doctor

    didn't mention
    > that the Lovastatin could be causing the liver problems

    when he
    > stopped it. It gets curiouser and curiouser <:>).
    > -
    > Albert


    So, is your new question "how can one lower cholesterol
    without stains?" If you need to know, many of us here
    have achieved better than excellent lipid numbers.


  19. #19
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 12:05:45 +1100, "Ozgirl"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> stopped it. It gets curiouser and curiouser <:>).
    >> -
    >> Albert

    >
    >So, is your new question "how can one lower cholesterol
    >without stains?" If you need to know, many of us here
    >have achieved better than excellent lipid numbers.


    Actually I don't really know what I'm going to do next other than I
    will be seeing my doctor again "soon".

    In the past I've tried to control my blood sugar with diet alone and
    it didn't work for me that's why I'm taking the metformin. And I just
    assumed that by dieting I could not control my cholesterol the same
    way therefore I was put on the lovastatin. I am open to any
    suggestions that you may have.

    For now I'm going to call it a day or better yet a week and kickback
    until Monday

    Thank you for your help
    -
    Albert

  20. #20
    DonnaB shallotpeel Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    In alt.support.diabetes on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 20:17:27 -0600 in Msg.#
    <[email protected]>, Albert <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > In the past I've tried to control my blood sugar with diet alone and
    > it didn't work for me that's why I'm taking the metformin. And I just
    > assumed that by dieting I could not control my cholesterol the same
    > way therefore I was put on the lovastatin. I am open to any
    > suggestions that you may have.


    I cannot take statins, so I take one of the non-statin cholesterol
    medications. I'll be glad to detail more about it if you are interested.

    --
    DonnaB
    06-07-06 Diagnosis T2 hbA1C 8.1, D&E & Metformin 500mg.
    ...................09-11-06 hbA1C 5.0
    ...................12-20-06 hbA1C 5.2

    "What is Ramius going to do, sail into New York Harbor, pop the hatch, and say
    'Here I am'?" - Captain Davenport, THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER [1990]

  21. #21
    Nicholson Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?


    "Ozgirl" <> wrote in message

    > So, is your new question "how can one lower cholesterol
    > without stains?" If you need to know, many of us here
    > have achieved better than excellent lipid numbers.
    >


    Ozgirl and Donna

    I'm interested as my doctor has me on Lipitor (and my husband is too).
    I'm willing to try making adjustments in diet and/or supplements to get
    off the Lipitor. Currently I'm T2 with low thyroid, on blood pressure
    meds and lipitor. I eat lowcarb and my blood sugars are stable for the
    most part, other than some dawn effect that brings me to 150-160 fasting
    in the AM reading. (but I plan to try the red wine and nuts for my late
    night snack at the first of the week, so that might help the dawn
    effect.

    Should I change the subject line?? Not too sure how this news group
    prefers things. If, new subject line is need, either of you could start
    it and I'll find your answers.

    Thank you,

    Cheryl



  22. #22
    Alan S Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 02:47:40 GMT, "Nicholson"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Should I change the subject line??


    Um, er, er, er, decisions, decisions...

    Nope, sorry, I'm the wrong person to answer this one.

    You decide:-)

    Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    d&e, metformin 1000mg, ezetrol 10mg
    Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.


  23. #23
    Alan S Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On 23 Mar 2007 16:15:36 -0700, "Larry" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mar 23, 3:34?pm, Alan S <loralgtweightandca...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On 23 Mar 2007 15:30:39 -0700, "Larry" <boelk...@aol.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> > It is a fact that 80% of obese non diabetics are IR.

    >>
    >> It sounds possible - but is it a fact? Do you have some
    >> support for that?
    >>
    >> Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.


    >Alan: I am surprised you don't know that fact. I'll have to dig it up
    >but believe me it is a clinical fact that 80% of obese non-diabetic
    >individuals are IR. If you think about it, IR is not the sole
    >component that T2s must have to be diagnosed. Therefore IR obese
    >individuals will not necessarily develope diabetes. Hence it also
    >stands to reason that some T2 individuals may have other factors more
    >important than IR.
    >
    >Larry


    Hey - I'm not surprised, what I don't know fills
    encyclopedias all over the world:-)

    As I said, it sounds possible but I've not seen it expressed
    that definitely before. I just though you may have
    supporting evidence

    Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    d&e, metformin 1000mg, ezetrol 10mg
    Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
    --
    http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/
    http://loraltravel.blogspot.com/
    latest: Epidaurus

  24. #24
    Alan S Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 20:17:27 -0600, Albert
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 12:05:45 +1100, "Ozgirl"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> stopped it. It gets curiouser and curiouser <:>).
    >>> -
    >>> Albert

    >>
    >>So, is your new question "how can one lower cholesterol
    >>without stains?" If you need to know, many of us here
    >>have achieved better than excellent lipid numbers.

    >
    >Actually I don't really know what I'm going to do next other than I
    >will be seeing my doctor again "soon".
    >
    >In the past I've tried to control my blood sugar with diet alone and
    >it didn't work for me that's why I'm taking the metformin. And I just
    >assumed that by dieting I could not control my cholesterol the same
    >way therefore I was put on the lovastatin. I am open to any
    >suggestions that you may have.
    >
    >For now I'm going to call it a day or better yet a week and kickback
    >until Monday
    >
    >Thank you for your help
    >-
    >Albert


    Hi Albert

    "In the past I've tried to control my blood sugar with diet
    alone and it didn't work for me"

    I won't guarantee that it will work alone - but have you
    tried this:
    http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org/NewlyDiagnosed.htm ?

    Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    d&e, metformin 1000mg, ezetrol 10mg
    Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
    --
    http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/
    http://loraltravel.blogspot.com/
    latest: Epidaurus

  25. #25
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Albert wrote:
    > On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 12:05:45 +1100, "Ozgirl"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> stopped it. It gets curiouser and curiouser <:>).
    >>> -
    >>> Albert

    >>
    >>So, is your new question "how can one lower cholesterol
    >>without stains?" If you need to know, many of us here
    >>have achieved better than excellent lipid numbers.


    Of course you know I meant statins not stains

    > Actually I don't really know what I'm going to do next

    other than I
    > will be seeing my doctor again "soon".


    That is good. I spent considerable time with doctors when
    first diagnosed, a lot of that time was spent getting the
    right BP med but we did touch on diet, med, exercise

    > In the past I've tried to control my blood sugar with diet

    alone and
    > it didn't work for me that's why I'm taking the metformin.

    And I just
    > assumed that by dieting I could not control my cholesterol

    the same
    > way therefore I was put on the lovastatin. I am open to

    any
    > suggestions that you may have.


    Well, this may not be for you but I found that the
    diet/exercise program I devised for myself took care of all
    factors, bg, cholesterol, weight loss, triglyerides etc. It
    does involve carb modification and lowering and going low
    "bad" fat but higher "good fat. Changing the type of carb to
    lower GI types helped enormously and also spreaidng my carbs
    out over 9 meals/snacks. This of course wouldn't suit
    everyone but worked brilliantly for me.

    I do a goodly amount of excercise (cardio and lean muscle
    building) as well. My lifestlye now suits me very well all
    round.

    > For now I'm going to call it a day or better yet a week

    and kickback
    > until Monday


    See you then then


  26. #26
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Nicholson wrote:
    > "Ozgirl" <> wrote in message
    >
    >> So, is your new question "how can one lower cholesterol
    >> without stains?" If you need to know, many of us here
    >> have achieved better than excellent lipid numbers.
    >>

    >
    > Ozgirl and Donna
    >
    > I'm interested as my doctor has me on Lipitor (and my

    husband is
    > too). I'm willing to try making adjustments in diet and/or
    > supplements to get off the Lipitor. Currently I'm T2 with

    low
    > thyroid, on blood pressure meds and lipitor. I eat lowcarb

    and my
    > blood sugars are stable for the most part, other than some

    dawn
    > effect that brings me to 150-160 fasting in the AM

    reading. (but I
    > plan to try the red wine and nuts for my late night snack

    at the
    > first of the week, so that might help the dawn effect.
    >
    > Should I change the subject line?? Not too sure how this

    news group
    > prefers things. If, new subject line is need, either of

    you could
    > start it and I'll find your answers.
    >
    > Thank you,
    >
    > Cheryl


    I think the subject line is still within the realm of the
    original. Lots of folk like to know of alternative to meds
    that can cause liver problems. What are the bg's for the
    rest of the day for you? I personally have a high'ish fbg
    every day but an A1c of average 4.8%. My daytime numbers are
    great but the dawn effect cruels it for me (in the mind
    ). If your daytime bg's are fine then the wine and nuts
    might help. Unfortunately a small glass of red wine makes my
    abdomen in the liver area hurt. I had 3 bourbons and diet
    coke last night with friends and it didn't give me that ache
    but I wouldn't be having bourbon every night. My bg this
    morning was in non diabetic range. If I could tolerate the
    red wine I would.


  27. #27
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 20:17:27 -0600, Albert <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In the past I've tried to control my blood sugar with diet alone and
    >it didn't work for me that's why I'm taking the metformin.


    What about the exercise half of the equation, Albert - is that not a
    possibility for you?

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.5% BMI 25

  28. #28
    Chris Malcolm Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Larry <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mar 23, 1:13???pm, "Ozgirl" <are_we_there_...@maccas.com> wrote:


    >> I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a combination
    >> of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss is
    >> one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance and
    >> therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds like
    >> Metformin.


    > Ozgirl: Weight loss MAY BE one of the best things to reduce insulin
    > resistance in many T2s. Furthermore IR may not be the primary culprit
    > in some T2s. As you know some T2s are not and never have been
    > overweight.


    I've never been overweight in the sense that my worst BMI was simply
    in the upper ranges of "normal healthy", but nevertheless reducing my
    weight by 9.5% (so far) seems to have improved my IR, and in general
    has improved such a variety of other health factors, including
    non-diabetic ones such as arthritis in weight-bearing joints, that I'm
    most definitely going to continue losing weight so long as there is
    any suggestion of pudginess around the waist and my general health and
    energy continues to improve.

    Many research studies have identified visceral adipose tissue as
    having hormonal and inflammatory effects which accelerate the
    progression of the metabolic syndrome and some of the complications of
    diabetes. It's possible to have accumulated significant deposits of
    visceral adipose tissue without becoming technically overweight,
    especially if you have an otherwise slim build.

    An old friend who hadn't seen me for five years turned up yesterday
    and remarked how in the last five years he seemed to got five years
    older whereas I seemed to have got five years younger.

    In this case for me the proof of the pudding has most definitely been
    in stopping eating it :-)

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]

  29. #29
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 09:42:17 +0000, Nicky <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 20:17:27 -0600, Albert <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>In the past I've tried to control my blood sugar with diet alone and
    >>it didn't work for me that's why I'm taking the metformin.

    >
    >What about the exercise half of the equation, Albert - is that not a
    >possibility for you?


    Nicky, actually as of April the 17th it will be one year since I had a
    total knee replacement. (Left knee) I am now beginning to get back to
    where I can walk 1 mile a day about every other day to allow for the
    swelling to go down. Work has been generally my preferred method of
    exercise because I feel more productive that way. Since I have
    discovered computers I know I have spent way too much time setting in
    front of one especially this last year. During this knee
    convalescence I've learned to put together a web page and other things
    on the computer but unfortunately it doesn't qualify as exercise ;>).
    So far I can sustain about two to three hours of work around the house
    or shop and it is getting better.

    >Nicky.
    >T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    >D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    >Last A1c 5.5% BMI 25


    Albert
    http://www.advantas.net/lason/

  30. #30
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 07:25:47 -0600, Albert <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Nicky, actually as of April the 17th it will be one year since I had a
    >total knee replacement. (Left knee) I am now beginning to get back to
    >where I can walk 1 mile a day about every other day to allow for the
    >swelling to go down.


    Right - you sounded like it was something like that. Have you tested
    before and after one of your walks? I'd bet that mile every other day
    has quite an effect on your bg; if that's the recuperation pattern
    that works best for you, how about walking an hour after lunch or
    supper to help with bg control for those meals? I'm wondering if half
    a mile daily would work, but that of course depends how your knee
    would cope? If you could work up eventually to a 20-min stroll after
    lunch and dinner every day, I bet you'd find bg control much easier.

    Are you able to do a bit of upper body strength training? I'm asking
    because muscles in use suck glucose out of your bloodstream whatever
    your level of insulin resistance. Muscles are also metabolically more
    active than anything else (except your brain ) and so building
    muscles is another very useful thing for a diabetic to do. Again, if
    you're not used to it, you need to start very cautiously. There's
    loads of information here, if you need a starter - this is a safe
    place to register with, they're spam-free, and a good resource for
    fitness, diet and lots more:
    http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness.asp

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.5% BMI 25

  31. #31
    Larry Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Mar 23, 5:41�pm, Albert <amla...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > On 23 Mar 2007 15:30:39 -0700, "Larry" <boelk...@aol.com> wrote:
    >
    > snipped for space
    >
    > >> Albert- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > >Albert: I agree with you. It is a fact that 80% of obese non diabetics
    > >are IR. I would not be taking metformin to just to safeguard you
    > >against IR particularly if it is determined that you are not presently
    > >IR by specific tests and that you are not overweight! Your lipid
    > >profile may suggest if you are IR or not. Even if you are not
    > >overweight, a very high LDL (dyslipidemia) may warrant taking
    > >metformin as a T2. Otherwise metformin is a pretty safe drug as it has
    > >been around for many years with a proven track record.

    >
    > >Larry

    >
    > Larry,
    >
    > *I can see right now that you are using terminology that is way over
    > my head (G). I just got off the phone with *the pharmacist and he told
    > me that the Lovastatin I am taking is a good candidate for the liver
    > problems. *I had complained to the doctor this week because I was
    > having a problem with short-term memory since I had been taking the
    > Lovastatin. *He took me off of it substituting it with another
    > cholesterol medication but didn't mention that it could of been the
    > reason for the liver problems. *So maybe the Metformin is not the
    > culprit, after all I have been taking the Metformin almost 10 years
    > with no problems other than having to increase the dosage I'm taking.
    > The pharmacist also told me that the medication he substituted *the
    > Lovastatin with "could" cause the same problem but far less likely.
    > -
    > Albert


    Chris: I certainly agree with you about the merits of loosing excess
    weight in lowering comorbidity issues unrelated to diabetes. In
    addition to that, bg levels typically improve in overweight T2s due to
    diet change alone and maybe a reduction in the kind of IR you refer
    to.
    Even when adipose fat accumlation is minimal, the liver can also
    "suffer" from IR in T2s as a significant problem.

    Larry



  32. #32
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    x-no-archive: yes

    Albert wrote:
    > On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 18:49:17 -0400, [email protected] (Loretta
    > Eisenberg) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Practically every medication goes through the liver so it would be hard
    >>to say if it was the metformin, are you on any statins. What does your
    >>doctor say.
    >>
    >>Loretta

    >
    >
    > Loretta,
    >
    > I apologize for not catching you post sooner. And yes I have been
    > taking Lovastatin this past year. As I said in a later post on this
    > thread that the doctor had taken me off of it and substituted it with
    > another medication. I also just found out from the pharmacist that it
    > could be the cause of the liver problems but my doctor didn't mention
    > that the Lovastatin could be causing the liver problems when he
    > stopped it. It gets curiouser and curiouser <:>).
    > -
    > Albert


    Albert, here's something that improves lipids and is anti inflammatory
    like statins, but has none of the toxicity, even in dialysis and
    hepatitis patients:


    [Evaluation of the cholesterol-lowering effectiveness of pantethine in
    women in perimenopausal age]

    [Article in Italian]

    Binaghi P, Cellina G, Lo Cicero G, Bruschi F, Porcaro E, Penotti M.

    Servizio di Cardiologia, Istitut Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milano.

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death also in women. Their
    incidence, rapidly growing in the peri-menopausal period, is related to
    serum levels of total cholesterol and its LDL fraction. It was also
    shown that the peroxidation of LDL is an additional factor in the
    genesis of atherosclerotic vascular disease. As long-term treatments
    with synthetic lipid-lowering drugs may cause undesirable side effects,
    while pantethine is known to be well tolerated, we treated 24
    hypercholesterolemic women (total serum cholesterol greater than or
    equal to 240 mg/dl), in perimenopausal age (range: 45-55 years, mean +/-
    SD = 51.6 +/- 2.4) with 900 mg/day of pantethine. This is a precursor of
    coenzyme A, with an antiperoxidation effect in vivo, and our aim was to
    confirm its lipid lowering activity in this particular type of patients.
    After 16 weeks of treatment, significant reductions of total
    cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio could be observed. No
    remarkable changes of the main laboratory parameters (fasting blood
    sugar, B.U.N., creatinine, uric acid) were seen. Efficacy percentages of
    the treatment were about 80%. None of the patients complained of adverse
    reactions due to the treatment with pantethine. In conclusion, we
    suggest that pantethine should be considered in the long-term treatment
    of lipid derangements occurring in the perimenopausal age.

    PMID: 2359503 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Acta Biomed Ateneo Parmense. 1984;55(1):25-42. Related Articles, Links


    [Hyperlipidemia, diabetes and atherosclerosis: efficacy of treatment
    with pantethine]

    [Article in Italian]

    Arsenio L, Caronna S, Lateana M, Magnati G, Strata A, Zammarchi G.

    The hypolipidemizing effects of Pantethine were investigated by the
    Authors in 37 hypercholesterolemic and/or hypertriglyceridemic patients.
    Of these, 21 were also diabetic, in a satisfying glucidic compensation,
    in order to verify the action of this drug also in this metabolic
    condition. The study was carried out for three months and during this
    period the patients were given Pantethine at the dose of 600 mg/die
    orally. At the 30th, the 60th, the 90th day of treatment the following
    parameters were controlled: cholesterolemia, HDL cholesterol,
    apolipoproteins A and B, triglyceridemia, systolic and diastolic
    arterial pressure, uricemia, body weight. Thirty days after suspending
    the treatment, the parameters were controlled again to detect a possible
    "rebound" effect. The results were analyzed on the whole case-record,
    subdividing the patients in dislipidemic and diabetic-dislipidemic, and
    on the basis of the Fredrickson's classification. Pantethine induced in
    all groups a quick and progressive decrease of cholesterolemia,
    triglyceridemia, LDL cholesterol and Apolipoproteins B with increased
    HDL cholesterol and Apolipoproteins A. After suspending the treatment,
    there is a clear inversion of the state of these parameters. The Authors
    conclude that the present work shows that Pantethine, a natural and
    atoxic substance, an important component of Coenzyme A, is efficacious
    in determining a clear tendency towards normalization of the lipidic values.

    PMID: 6232801 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Atherosclerosis. 1984 Jan;50(1):73-83. Related Articles, Links


    Controlled evaluation of pantethine, a natural hypolipidemic compound,
    in patients with different forms of hyperlipoproteinemia.

    Gaddi A, Descovich GC, Noseda G, Fragiacomo C, Colombo L, Craveri A,
    Montanari G, Sirtori CR.

    Pantethine (P), the stable disulphate form of pantetheine, major
    component and precursor of coenzyme A, was evaluated within a
    double-blind protocol (8 weeks for P or for a corresponding placebo) in
    29 patients, 11 with type IIB hyperlipoproteinemia, 15 with type IV, and
    3 with an isolated reduction of high density lipoprotein cholesterol
    (HDL-C) levels. In type IIB patients, P (300 mg t.i.d.) determined a
    highly significant lowering of plasma total and low density lipoprotein
    (LDL) associated cholesterol (-13.5% for both parameters). In the same
    patients, HDL-C levels increased about 10% at the end of treatment.
    Switching from P to placebo was associated with a rapid return to the
    baseline cholesterolemia. Both in type IIB and type IV patients, plasma
    triglyceride levels were reduced around 30%, when P was given as the
    first treatment; when it was preceded by placebo, reductions were less
    striking (respectively, -17.8% for type IIB and -13.0% for type IV, at
    the end of P treatment). HDL-C levels were not increased by P, either in
    type IV, and in the patients with low HDL cholesterolemia. In type IV,
    LDL cholesterol levels showed a variable response to P: they tended to
    increase when below 132 mg/dl, prior to treatment, and to be reduced
    when above this level. This study provides evidence for a significant
    hypocholesterolemic effect of P, a natural compound free of overt side
    effects. It also indicates that P may raise HDL-C levels in type IIB
    patients, while moderately reducing triglyceridemia.

    Publication Types:
    Clinical Trial
    Controlled Clinical Trial

    PMID: 6365107 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol. 1986 Nov;24(11):630-7. Related
    Articles, Links


    Lipoprotein changes induced by pantethine in hyperlipoproteinemic
    patients: adults and children.

    Bertolini S, Donati C, Elicio N, Daga A, Cuzzolaro S, Marcenaro A,
    Saturnino M, Balestreri R.

    Following a brief outline of current knowledge concerning
    atherosclerosis and its treatment, the authors describe the results
    obtained by treating with pantethine (900-1200 mg daily for 3 to 6
    months) a series of 7 children and 65 adults suffering from
    hypercholesterolemia alone or associated with hypertriglyceridemia
    (types IIa and IIb of Fredrickson's classification). Pantethine
    treatment produced significant reduction of the better known risk
    factors (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and apo-B)
    and a significant increase of HDL-cholesterol (signally HDL2) and
    apolipoprotein A-I. The authors conclude with a discussion of these
    results and of the possible role of pantethine in the treatment of
    hyperlipoproteinemia, in view of its perfect tolerability and
    demonstrated therapeutic effectiveness.

    PMID: 3098691 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    : Atherosclerosis. 1984 Dec;53(3):255-64. Related Articles, Links


    Pantethine reduces plasma cholesterol and the severity of arterial
    lesions in experimental hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    Carrara P, Matturri L, Galbussera M, Lovati MR, Franceschini G, Sirtori CR.

    Pantethine (P), a coenzyme A precursor, was administered to
    cholesterol-fed rabbits (0.5% cholesterol diet + 1% pantethine) for 90
    days. At the end of treatment, plasma total cholesterol levels were
    reduced 64.7% and the HDL/total cholesterol ratio increased in P-treated
    animals; a significant rise of the apo A-I/A-II ratio was detected in
    HDL. VLDL lipid and protein levels were, on the other hand, reduced by
    P. The cholesterol-ester content of both liver and aortic tissues was
    not significantly affected by P. Although the total aortic area with
    evident plaques was reduced only 18.2%, the microscopical examination of
    sections from the major vessels of P-treated animals, showed a reduction
    in the severity of lesions, both in the aorta and in the coronary
    arteries. These findings suggest that P, in addition to significantly
    lowering plasma cholesterol levels in rabbits on an experimental diet,
    may modify lipid deposition in major arteries, possibly by affecting
    lipoprotein composition and/or exerting an arterial protective effect.

    PMID: 6442152 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Clin Ther. 1986;8(5):537-45. Related Articles, Links


    Effectiveness of long-term treatment with pantethine in patients with
    dyslipidemia.

    Arsenio L, Bodria P, Magnati G, Strata A, Trovato R.

    A one-year clinical trial with pantethine was conducted in 24 patients
    with established dyslipidemia of Fredrickson's types II A, II B, and IV,
    alone or associated with diabetes mellitus. The treatment was well
    tolerated by all patients with no subjective complaints or detectable
    side effects. Blood lipid assays repeated after 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12
    months of treatment revealed consistent and statistically significant
    reductions of all atherogenic lipid fractions (total cholesterol,
    low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B) with parallel
    increases of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein A.
    The results were equally good in patients with uncomplicated
    dyslipidemia and in those with associated diabetes mellitus. The authors
    conclude that pantethine (a drug entity related to the natural compound,
    pantetheine) represents a valid therapeutic support for patients with
    dyslipidemia not amenable to satisfactory correction of blood lipids by
    diet alone.

    PMID: 3094958 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Acta Biomed Ateneo Parmense. 1987;58(5-6):143-52. Related Articles, Links


    [Clinical use of pantethine by parenteral route in the treatment of
    hyperlipidemia]

    [Article in Italian]

    Arsenio L, Bodria P, Bossi S, Lateana M, Strata A.

    Servizio di Malattie del Ricambio e Diabetologia, Ospedali Riuniti, Parma.

    Recent investigations have confirmed the effectiveness and the excellent
    tolerability of pantethine, a derivative of pantetheine, an essential
    part of the acetylation coenzyme CoA, administered P.O., in normalizing
    the blood lipid concentrations of patients with hyperlipidemias. A group
    of 18 patients with hyperlipidemias (9 M, 9 F), with an average age of
    52.6 years, was submitted to pantethine parenteral treatment. After a 20
    days wash-out, pantethine (400 mg/day; BID) was administered
    intramuscularly, for 20 days. Total cholesterol, triglycerides,
    HDL-cholesterol, apo A-1 and B lipoprotein, uric acid in serum,
    glycemia, CBC, B.U.N., creatininemia, E.S.R., SGOT, SGPT, bilirubinemia,
    cardiac frequency, blood pressure and body weight were controlled before
    and after treatment. The drug showed to have a therapeutic effectiveness
    by a rapid and significant improvement in the blood lipid pattern with
    reduction of total cholesterol, triglycerides and apo-B lipoprotein and
    increase of HDL-cholesterol and apo A-1 lipoprotein. The tolerability of
    pantethine at the stated dosage and mode of administration was
    invariably excellent, with non complaints or visible side effects
    imputable to the test drug. BUN, creatininemia, glycemia, SGOT, SGPT,
    bilirubinemia, E.S.R., CBC, cardiac frequency and blood pressure
    readings showed no noteworthy changes throughout the study.

    PMID: 2970754 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    1: Vopr Pitan. 1987 Mar-Apr;(2):15-7. Related Articles, Links


    [Therapeutic efficacy of pantothenic acid preparations in ischemic heart
    disease patients]

    [Article in Russian]

    Borets VM, Lis MA, Pyrochkin VM, Kishkovich VP, Butkevich ND.

    The therapeutic effectiveness of the pantothenic acid drugs:
    calciipantothenas and pantethine, was studied in 182 patients with
    coronary heart disease and stable angina of effort. It is shown that
    both the drugs produce favourable effects on certain parameters of
    hemodynamics, on the metabolism of lipids, riboflavin and ascorbic acid.
    It is recommended that the administration of calciipantothenas in a dose
    of 300 mg/day, during 3 weeks, be included into the combined treatment
    of coronary patients with no manifest disorders of lipid metabolism.
    Patients with manifest hyperlipidemia should be administered pantethine
    in a dose of 500 mg/day.

    PMID: 3590676 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

    1: Clin Nephrol. 1986 Feb;25(2):70-4. Related Articles, Links


    Pantethine improves the lipid abnormalities of chronic hemodialysis
    patients: results of a multicenter clinical trial.

    Donati C, Barbi G, Cairo G, Prati GF, Degli Esposti E.

    In the course of a post-marketing surveillance program on the
    effectiveness and tolerability of pantethine in the treatment of
    hyperlipidemia, the effects of the drug were explored in 31 patients
    with dyslipidemia undergoing chronic hemodialysis. The mean duration of
    treatment was 9 months (min. 7 months, max. 24 months), with oral doses
    of 600 to 1200 mg of pantethine daily (mean daily dosage 970 mg).
    Improvement was noted in terms of total blood cholesterol in the 7
    patients with basal hypercholesterolemia (p less than 0.01) and highly
    significant reduction of serum triglycerides. No variations of
    HDL-cholesterol or total Apo-A were detected. None of the patients
    experienced any adverse effects from the treatment. In the light of
    extensive experience with the drug, plus the results of this study, the
    authors conclude by stressing the importance of an effective and readily
    tolerated product, such as pantethine, for the treatment of dyslipidemia
    in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    Publication Types:
    Clinical Trial

    PMID: 3516477 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Artery. 1987;15(1):1-12. Related Articles, Links


    Lowering effect of pantethine on plasma beta-thromboglobulin and lipids
    in diabetes mellitus.

    Eto M, Watanabe K, Chonan N, Ishii K.

    Second Department of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical College, Japan.

    Pantethine in a dosage of 600 mg for the first 3 months, and in a dosage
    of 1200 mg for the second 6 months was given to 16 diabetics in whom
    plasma beta-thromboglobulin was raised (greater than 50 ng/ml). Plasma
    beta-TG levels decreased significantly with pantethine treatment for 9
    months. Plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol, apo E and apo CII levels
    decreased significantly after 9 months. Plasma LDL-C and atherogenic
    index (LDL-C/HDL-C ratio or apo B/apo AI ratio) tended to decrease with
    treatment. It is concluded that administration of pantethine may be
    beneficial in the prevention of diabetic angiopathy because of its
    lowering effect on plasma beta-TG, lipids and apolipoproteins.

    PMID: 2963604 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Ter Arkh. 1991;63(11):58-60. Related Articles, Links


    [The use of pantothenic acid preparations in treating patients with
    viral hepatitis A]

    [Article in Russian]

    Komar VI.

    Calcium pantothemate in the daily dose 300 mg and 600 mg and pantetheine
    in the dose 90 mg and 180 mg per os were applied for 3-4 weeks in
    combined therapy of 156 patients with viral hepatitis A. In addition to
    the positive clinico-biochemical effect, these drugs produced an
    immunomodulatory action and a beneficial effect on the level of blood
    serum immunoglobulins and the phagocytic activity of peripheral blood
    neutrophils. Pantetheine provided the most pronounced therapeutic effect.

    PMID: 1810066 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Clin Ter. 1989 Mar 31;128(6):411-22. Related Articles, Links


    [Pantethine, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Clinical study of
    1045 patients]

    [Article in Italian]

    Donati C, Bertieri RS, Barbi G.

    After a review of the clinical studies on the treatment of diabetic
    patients with pantethine, the authors discuss the results obtained in a
    postmarketing surveillance (PMS) study on 1045 hyperlipidemic patients
    receiving pantethine (900 mg/day on average). Of these patients, 57 were
    insulin-dependent (Type I) and 241 were non insulin-dependent (Type II)
    diabetics. Beyond the epidemiological considerations made possible by a
    PMS study, the authors show that pantethine brought about a
    statistically significant and comparable improvement of lipid metabolism
    in the three groups of patients, with very good tolerability. Pantethine
    should therefore be considered for the treatment of lipid abnormalities
    also in patients at risk such as those with diabetes mellitus.

    PMID: 2524328 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Vopr Pitan. 1983;(1):45-9. Related Articles, Links


    [Pantothenic acid metabolic disorder and its relation to the change in
    energy processes in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypertension]

    [Article in Russian]

    Borets VM, Ovchinnikov VA, Mironchik VV, Moiseenok AG, Lis MA.

    Pantothenic acid metabolism and the status of energy processes in
    leukocytes were examined in 171 patients with hypertension and coronary
    heart disease. It was shown that the patients' body supply with the
    vitamin decreased as the disease progressed and heart failure
    supervened. The deficiency of pantothenic acid was shown to be
    interrelated with the impairment of energy processes. Application of
    pantothenate in a dose of 200 mg a day for two weeks led to the
    increased content of pantothenic acid and to normalization of energy
    processes.

    PMID: 6837001 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    1: Angiology. 1987 Mar;38(3):241-7. Related Articles, Links


    Effect of oral treatment with pantethine on platelet and plasma
    phospholipids in IIa hyperlipoproteinemia.

    Prisco D, Rogasi PG, Matucci M, Paniccia R, Abbate R, Gensini GF, Neri
    Serneri GG.

    In a single-blind, crossover, completely randomized study, the effects
    of oral treatment with pantethine or placebo on fatty acid composition
    of plasma and platelet phospholipids were investigated in 10 IIa
    hyperlipoproteinemic patients. A significant decrease of total
    cholesterol and total phospholipids was observed both in plasma and in
    platelets after a twenty-eight-day treatment. In plasma, pantethine
    induced a decrease of the ratio sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine.
    Moreover, a relative increase of n3-polyunsaturated fatty acids both in
    plasma and in platelet phospholipids and a decrease of arachidonic acid
    in plasma phospholipids were observed. These results indicate that
    pantethine can affect plasma and platelet lipid composition with
    possibly favorable influences on the determinants of cell membrane fluidity.

    Publication Types:
    Clinical Trial
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    PMID: 3551695 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



  33. #33
    Albert Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 14:49:22 +0000, Nicky <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >
    >Right - you sounded like it was something like that. Have you tested
    >before and after one of your walks? I'd bet that mile every other day
    >has quite an effect on your bg; if that's the recuperation pattern
    >that works best for you, how about walking an hour after lunch or
    >supper to help with bg control for those meals? I'm wondering if half
    >a mile daily would work, but that of course depends how your knee
    >would cope? If you could work up eventually to a 20-min stroll after
    >lunch and dinner every day, I bet you'd find bg control much easier.
    >
    >Are you able to do a bit of upper body strength training? I'm asking
    >because muscles in use suck glucose out of your bloodstream whatever
    >your level of insulin resistance. Muscles are also metabolically more
    >active than anything else (except your brain ) and so building
    >muscles is another very useful thing for a diabetic to do. Again, if
    >you're not used to it, you need to start very cautiously. There's
    >loads of information here, if you need a starter - this is a safe
    >place to register with, they're spam-free, and a good resource for
    >fitness, diet and lots more:
    >http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/fitness.asp


    Thank you for the suggestions, I'm just going to kickback this
    weekend and digest everything I've learned on this NG to date. One
    good thing at least the digestion of it will not affect my BG or
    cholesterol!? VBG

    -
    Albert

  34. #34
    Susan Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    x-no-archive: yes

    Albert wrote:

    > I was telling my wife what you said and she asked what now seems an
    > obvious question and I didn't think of it. If it's not too personal a
    > question, what type of treatment are you using instead of the
    > Metformin?
    > -
    > Albert


    Diet, no starch, basically.

    I have other medical issues that make insulin sensitizing unwise for me
    right now.

    Susan

  35. #35
    bj Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    "Albert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >>

    > Nicky, actually as of April the 17th it will be one year since I had a
    > total knee replacement. (Left knee) I am now beginning to get back to
    > where I can walk 1 mile a day about every other day to allow for the
    > swelling to go down. Work has been generally my preferred method of
    > exercise because I feel more productive that way. Since I have
    > discovered computers I know I have spent way too much time setting in
    > front of one especially this last year. During this knee
    > convalescence I've learned to put together a web page and other things
    > on the computer but unfortunately it doesn't qualify as exercise ;>).
    > So far I can sustain about two to three hours of work around the house
    > or shop and it is getting better.
    >


    There are plenty of seated-aerobic exercises you could try out.
    If you don't want to look further, just sit down & listen to your favorite
    classical symphony & "conduct" -- that can be a great workout in itself &
    there are plenty of symphonies to listen to.
    bj



  36. #36
    Ozgirl Guest

    Default Re: Can Metformin cause liver damage?

    Chris Malcolm wrote:
    > Larry <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Mar 23, 1:13???pm, "Ozgirl"

    <are_we_there_...@maccas.com> wrote:
    >
    >>> I can't speak for Susan but I personally use a

    combination
    >>> of lowered carbs, exercise and weight loss. Weight loss

    is
    >>> one of the best things for reducing insulin resistance

    and
    >>> therefore reducing the need for insulin resistance meds

    like
    >>> Metformin.

    >
    >> Ozgirl: Weight loss MAY BE one of the best things to

    reduce insulin
    >> resistance in many T2s. Furthermore IR may not be the

    primary culprit
    >> in some T2s. As you know some T2s are not and never have

    been
    >> overweight.

    >
    > I've never been overweight in the sense that my worst BMI

    was simply
    > in the upper ranges of "normal healthy", but nevertheless

    reducing my
    > weight by 9.5% (so far) seems to have improved my IR, and

    in general
    > has improved such a variety of other health factors,

    including
    > non-diabetic ones such as arthritis in weight-bearing

    joints, that I'm
    > most definitely going to continue losing weight so long as

    there is
    > any suggestion of pudginess around the waist and my

    general health and
    > energy continues to improve.
    >
    > Many research studies have identified visceral adipose

    tissue as
    > having hormonal and inflammatory effects which accelerate

    the
    > progression of the metabolic syndrome and some of the

    complications of
    > diabetes. It's possible to have accumulated significant

    deposits of
    > visceral adipose tissue without becoming technically

    overweight,
    > especially if you have an otherwise slim build.


    Like my grandmother, she was tall and slim with a tiny pot
    belly and when she was admitted to a nursing home she got
    far less "exercise" (she was a wanderer and that was
    curtailed in the home). Anyway she was 92 and her first
    blood tests after admission showed diabetes.

    > An old friend who hadn't seen me for five years turned up

    yesterday
    > and remarked how in the last five years he seemed to got

    five years
    > older whereas I seemed to have got five years younger.
    >
    > In this case for me the proof of the pudding has most

    definitely been
    > in stopping eating it :-)


    I've never been in the habit of pud anyway so that was easy
    for me. I know people who don't think a meal is complete
    without dessert.



Similar Threads

  1. Is this nerve damage?
    By [email protected] in forum alt.support.diabetes
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 11-08-2006, 09:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28