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Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?
  1. #1
    Nicky Guest

    Default Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    I have a puzzle for you. Right now, I am fit, a good weight, and used
    to doing several miles' walking a day plus twice-weekly karate lessons
    for an hour. I eat low carb, and have done for years; the rest of my
    family eat my meals with an optional carb side.

    I've just some back from a mountain walking holiday in Spain. Walking
    on the (relatively) flat or downhill was no problem whatsoever. I did
    several hours-long, fast walks with no bother at all. Walking uphill
    for even the smallest distance, OTOH, causes my thighs to cramp, I get
    breathless, and turn an interesting shade of purple. Hubby has exactly
    the opposite reaction - he hates walking downhill, because he finds
    he's slower, uses more energy, and puts his joints more at risk.

    We have literally split mountains in half - I'll go up the ski-lift
    whilst he walks up with one kid, then I'll walk down with the other
    whilst he uses the down ticket. This time, mutter, the ski lifts were
    out for maintenance - so we both had to walk in both directions, and
    it made our different reactions to the mountain very clear. However,
    we get pretty well the same reactions if we walk up and down a baby
    hill at home.

    Who's normal? What's causing my problems? Is there anything I can do
    about it? Beach holidays are just not going to cut it... and trust me,
    it's not underdeveloped quads.

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  2. #2
    Chris Malcolm Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Nicky <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have a puzzle for you. Right now, I am fit, a good weight, and used
    > to doing several miles' walking a day plus twice-weekly karate lessons
    > for an hour. I eat low carb, and have done for years; the rest of my
    > family eat my meals with an optional carb side.


    > I've just some back from a mountain walking holiday in Spain. Walking
    > on the (relatively) flat or downhill was no problem whatsoever. I did
    > several hours-long, fast walks with no bother at all. Walking uphill
    > for even the smallest distance, OTOH, causes my thighs to cramp, I get
    > breathless, and turn an interesting shade of purple. Hubby has exactly
    > the opposite reaction - he hates walking downhill, because he finds
    > he's slower, uses more energy, and puts his joints more at risk.


    Sounds to me like your cardiovascular system can't push the blood
    round your system fast enough, and to quite a serious extent. Your
    thighs are cramping because they're starved of oxygen and waste
    products aren't being flushed away. Purple also suggests oxygen
    deficit. Breathless could either be because lung capacity can't cope
    with the demand, or it could be a side effect of a labouring heart.

    If this problem has developed recently I'd make taking your problem to
    a doctor a priority.

    Some years ago I started developing the kind of downhill problems your
    description suggests of your hubby. Everyone suggested I needed top
    start using walking poles. They certainly helped, and for about a year
    I was an enthusiastic poler. Then I thought through the biological
    mechanics of the problem and decided to try going down hill keeping my
    knees bent to cushion the downwards impact, rather than gingerly
    stretching a straight out and down, and then taking the landing wallop
    straight through all the bones and joints.

    I found I needed to develop some extra leg strength, but that happened
    quite quickly. I was then able to throw the poles away and resume the
    kind of rapid half walking half running down hill I used to do when a
    lot younger, before more fragile knees and hips had slowed me down.

    > Who's normal?


    Problems going up and down hills aren't normal.

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]


  3. #3
    Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    neighbor Nicky wrote:
    >
    > I have a puzzle for you. Right now, I am fit, a good weight, and used
    > to doing several miles' walking a day plus twice-weekly karate lessons
    > for an hour. I eat low carb, and have done for years; the rest of my
    > family eat my meals with an optional carb side.
    >
    > I've just some back from a mountain walking holiday in Spain. Walking
    > on the (relatively) flat or downhill was no problem whatsoever. I did
    > several hours-long, fast walks with no bother at all. Walking uphill
    > for even the smallest distance, OTOH, causes my thighs to cramp, I get
    > breathless, and turn an interesting shade of purple.


    Would suggest you seek a referral to consult with a cardiologist.

    <><

    http://groups.google.com/group/sci.m...8812d72ab4e17?

  4. #4
    Michelle C Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?


    "Nicky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have a puzzle for you. Right now, I am fit, a good weight, and used
    > to doing several miles' walking a day plus twice-weekly karate lessons
    > for an hour. I eat low carb, and have done for years; the rest of my
    > family eat my meals with an optional carb side.
    >
    > I've just some back from a mountain walking holiday in Spain. Walking
    > on the (relatively) flat or downhill was no problem whatsoever. I did
    > several hours-long, fast walks with no bother at all. Walking uphill
    > for even the smallest distance, OTOH, causes my thighs to cramp, I get
    > breathless, and turn an interesting shade of purple. Hubby has exactly
    > the opposite reaction - he hates walking downhill, because he finds
    > he's slower, uses more energy, and puts his joints more at risk.
    >
    > We have literally split mountains in half - I'll go up the ski-lift
    > whilst he walks up with one kid, then I'll walk down with the other
    > whilst he uses the down ticket. This time, mutter, the ski lifts were
    > out for maintenance - so we both had to walk in both directions, and
    > it made our different reactions to the mountain very clear. However,
    > we get pretty well the same reactions if we walk up and down a baby
    > hill at home.
    >
    > Who's normal? What's causing my problems? Is there anything I can do
    > about it? Beach holidays are just not going to cut it... and trust me,
    > it's not underdeveloped quads.
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25


    Hi Nicky,

    Even if your quads are well-developed, sometimes the little muscles around
    the knees aren't as strong as they should be and can put extra strain on
    other muscles--at least my uncle who is a physical therapist says this can
    happen. If some of your other muscles aren't up to par, then perhaps you
    are working those quads very hard trying to compensate. If this is the
    case, it's just a matter of doing the correct exercises to strengthen them.

    While Chris may be right that it's a heart issue, I would be surprised that
    other physical activities don't bring on the breathlessness and purple color
    if it is. (Just my thought process--no actual knowledge.) Still, it's best
    to check it all out--especially since you've got easy access to health care
    in Britain.
    --
    Best regards,
    Michelle C., T2
    diet & exercise
    BMI 21.5



  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 03:46:47 -0700 (PDT), "Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >> I've just some back from a mountain walking


    I do have some problems due to age. I, long ago,
    found the way to control it is just to QUIT now.

    As important is mental stress, reason I take
    few seriously. The whole thing is a silly joke.

    Think, post our views here if we must. Then slow
    down and relax.

    "Mentally ill people drive themselves crazy".

    Saw this in a car repair shop. Very true.


    ----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
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  6. #6
    John C. Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Aug 30, 3:55*pm, Nicky <ukc802466...@btconnect.com> wrote:
    > I have a puzzle for you. Right now, I am fit, a good weight, and used
    > to doing several miles' walking a day plus twice-weekly karate lessons
    > for an hour. I eat low carb, and have done for years; the rest of my
    > family eat my meals with an optional carb side.
    >
    > I've just some back from a mountain walking holiday in Spain. Walking
    > on the (relatively) flat or downhill was no problem whatsoever. I did
    > several hours-long, fast walks with no bother at all. Walking uphill
    > for even the smallest distance, OTOH, causes my thighs to cramp, I get
    > breathless, and turn an interesting shade of purple. Hubby has exactly
    > the opposite reaction - he hates walking downhill, because he finds
    > he's slower, uses more energy, and puts his joints more at risk.
    >
    > We have literally split mountains in half - I'll go up the ski-lift
    > whilst he walks up with one kid, then I'll walk down with the other
    > whilst he uses the down ticket. This time, mutter, the ski lifts were
    > out for maintenance - so we both had to walk in both directions, and
    > it made our different reactions to the mountain very clear. However,
    > we get pretty well the same reactions if we walk up and down a baby
    > hill at home.
    >
    > Who's normal? What's causing my problems? Is there anything I can do
    > about it? Beach holidays are just not going to cut it... and trust me,
    > it's not underdeveloped quads.
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% *BMI 25


    I'd see a doc about that Nicky. I walk quite a bit and uphill, while I
    do start breathing a bit heavier, it doesn't pose any major problems.

    Keep in mind that walking uphill is supposed to cause extra taxation
    on the cardiovascular system. This is why, during a stress test, they
    keep increasing both the speed and incline until you fail. I finally
    pooped out after they went to 4.1 MPH at a 14 degree incline. But I
    didn't have any cramping or color changes...just tireness and my legs
    felt like rubber. D

    John C.

  7. #7
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:04:26 -0700 (PDT), "John C."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'd see a doc about that Nicky. I walk quite a bit and uphill, while I
    >do start breathing a bit heavier, it doesn't pose any major problems.


    Thanks for the replies, guys. I had a minor heart attack in 2000
    following a car crash, and had a Bruce protocol stress test and an MRI
    3? years ago, and was cleared of residual heart issues then. Right
    now, apart from walking uphill I feel absolutely great - I'd feel a
    fraud going in to a doc's office and claiming a problem. I promise I
    will if it starts to interfere with my life outside my mountain
    walking holidays!

    Michelle's minor muscle theory is interesting - I also strained the
    ligament on the inside of my right knee on holiday, which is
    definitely a minor muscle related prob. I've just signed up for a new
    gym - the dojo's opened one - and have acquired a hulk of a personal
    trainer with sports physio expertise, I'll ask him to add
    quad-stabilising muscles to my programme.

    Chris, hubby says you're quite right about half-walking, half-running
    downhill being easier - and if he didn't have to wait around for his
    womenfolk, he'd be able to do it more We bought him a cheapy
    walking stick and had to leave it in Spain - we did cabin baggage
    only, they have a thing about pointy sticks. As you say, it definitely
    feels better, but probably isn't doing him any favours.

    Thanks again,

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  8. #8
    Uncle Enrico Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Nicky wrote:
    > I have a puzzle for you. Right now, I am fit, a good weight, and used
    > to doing several miles' walking a day plus twice-weekly karate lessons
    > for an hour. I eat low carb, and have done for years; the rest of my
    > family eat my meals with an optional carb side.
    >
    > I've just some back from a mountain walking holiday in Spain. Walking
    > on the (relatively) flat or downhill was no problem whatsoever. I did
    > several hours-long, fast walks with no bother at all. Walking uphill
    > for even the smallest distance, OTOH, causes my thighs to cramp, I get
    > breathless, and turn an interesting shade of purple. Hubby has exactly
    > the opposite reaction - he hates walking downhill, because he finds
    > he's slower, uses more energy, and puts his joints more at risk.
    >
    > We have literally split mountains in half - I'll go up the ski-lift
    > whilst he walks up with one kid, then I'll walk down with the other
    > whilst he uses the down ticket. This time, mutter, the ski lifts were
    > out for maintenance - so we both had to walk in both directions, and
    > it made our different reactions to the mountain very clear. However,
    > we get pretty well the same reactions if we walk up and down a baby
    > hill at home.
    >
    > Who's normal? What's causing my problems? Is there anything I can do
    > about it? Beach holidays are just not going to cut it... and trust me,
    > it's not underdeveloped quads.


    Five years ago I started walking 5.5 miles a day--almost every day. I
    cycled and swam too.

    Two years ago, I started hiking up inclines--mountains, hills, steep
    inclines from beaches to cliffs, that sort of thing.

    I found hiking up inclines to be a whole new experience that required
    physical development that I didn't get with daily walking, swimming and
    cycling.

    The first thing I did was to buy good boots and a heart monitor to make
    sure I wasn't going much over 85% of my maximum heart rate. A neighbor
    who sometimes hiked with me told me how his heart muscle developed new
    vascular blood supply with routine hiking--following a heart attack. He
    had to take it slowly, of course. He advised getting a heart monitor.

    The best monitors require a chest strap and give a continuous read out.

    other monitors give readouts "on-demand" and need no strap. Most
    require your birthdate, age, and resting heart rate to calculate your
    maximum heart rate and caloric output.

    But go see your doc.

    Cheers.

  9. #9
    Tiger_Lily Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Nicky wrote:
    > On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:04:26 -0700 (PDT), "John C."
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'd see a doc about that Nicky. I walk quite a bit and uphill, while I
    >> do start breathing a bit heavier, it doesn't pose any major problems.

    >
    > Thanks for the replies, guys. I had a minor heart attack in 2000
    > following a car crash, and had a Bruce protocol stress test and an MRI
    > 3? years ago, and was cleared of residual heart issues then. Right
    > now, apart from walking uphill I feel absolutely great - I'd feel a
    > fraud going in to a doc's office and claiming a problem. I promise I
    > will if it starts to interfere with my life outside my mountain
    > walking holidays!
    >
    > Michelle's minor muscle theory is interesting - I also strained the
    > ligament on the inside of my right knee on holiday, which is
    > definitely a minor muscle related prob. I've just signed up for a new
    > gym - the dojo's opened one - and have acquired a hulk of a personal
    > trainer with sports physio expertise, I'll ask him to add
    > quad-stabilising muscles to my programme.
    >
    > Chris, hubby says you're quite right about half-walking, half-running
    > downhill being easier - and if he didn't have to wait around for his
    > womenfolk, he'd be able to do it more We bought him a cheapy
    > walking stick and had to leave it in Spain - we did cabin baggage
    > only, they have a thing about pointy sticks. As you say, it definitely
    > feels better, but probably isn't doing him any favours.
    >
    > Thanks again,
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25


    no no no no no

    now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    happening with your heart!

    please???

    --
    kate
    type 1 since 1987
    www.diabetic-chat.org
    www.diabetic-talk.org
    http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/n...diagnosed.html

  10. #10
    bgl Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    "Uncle Enrico" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:cCFuk.20999$[email protected]..
    >
    > other monitors give readouts "on-demand" and need no strap. Most require
    > your birthdate, age, and resting heart rate to calculate your maximum
    > heart rate and caloric output.
    >


    Your calculated max & target % numbers aren't going to change more than once
    a year (on your birthday!), so that calc only has to be done once, even if
    you never tell the HRM anything & just look at its readout you can see as
    you go if you're "in range." :-)

    Besides, they (usually, I think) use the (220-age) as the "max" and that may
    not be at all what your real max is. I know I run "higher" than my HRM
    thinks is in the 60-85% range & have no trouble with that. I'm often over
    "100%". I may be breathing hard but I'm not "in distress."

    But you do have to work up to it, and adjust for conditions like hot
    weather, fatigue, whatever -- i.e. just because I can take that hill at 165
    on a cool day when I feel good doesn't mean I should always aim to do so.

    I don't worry about caloric output. I let my scale tell me if I've got a
    calorie-balance problem. :-)

    I've been using a Garmin Forerunner. I take a screen-print of the log to
    show my doctors. It gives distance, time, pace, max & ave HR. Neato gadget.
    bj





  11. #11
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 16:29:13 -0600, Tiger_Lily <[email protected]> wrote:

    >now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    >he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    >treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    >happening with your heart!
    >
    >please???


    I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    climbing a mountain. Honest! But I feel great atm, and I passed a
    treadmill stress test a few years ago.

    Please don't worry about me. I'm disgustingly fit - good weight,
    eating well, plenty of exercise; and a doc and an emergency hospital
    not far away if I'm being an idiot anyway : )

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  12. #12
    Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    neighbor Nicky wrote:
    > convicted neighbor Kate (Tiger_Lily <[email protected]>) wrote:
    >
    > >now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    > >he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    > >treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    > >happening with your heart!
    > >
    > >please???

    >
    > I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    > climbing a mountain.


    You would still be wise to inform your doctor(s) about your new
    exertional symptoms and allow them to advise you about whether a
    referral to consult with a cardiologist is warranted.

    May you and other dear neighbors have a blessedly wonderful 2008th
    year since the birth of our LORD Jesus Christ as our Messiah, the Son
    of Man ...

    .... by being hungrier:

    http://groups.google.com/group/sci.m...1e617d10bd689?

    Hunger is wonderful ! ! !

    It's how we know the answer to the question "What does Jesus
    want?" (WDJW):

    http://groups.google.com/group/sci.m...db72a7c5c1da0?

    Yes, hunger is our knowledge of good versus evil that Adam and Eve
    paid for with their and our immortal lives.

    "Blessed are you who hunger NOW...

    .... for you will be satisfied." -- LORD Jesus Christ (Luke 6:21)

    Amen.

    Here is a Spirit-guided exegesis of Luke 6:21 given in hopes of
    promoting much greater understanding:

    http://groups.google.com/group/sci.m...aa8f8a4d41360?

    Be hungrier, which is truly healthier.

    Marana tha

    Prayerfully in the awesome name of our Messiah, LORD Jesus Christ,

    Andrew <><
    --
    http://groups.google.com/group/sci.m...8812d72ab4e17?

  13. #13
    MI Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?




    On 9/1/08 5:12 AM, in article [email protected],
    "Nicky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 16:29:13 -0600, Tiger_Lily <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    >> he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    >> treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    >> happening with your heart!
    >>
    >> please???

    >
    > I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    > climbing a mountain. Honest! But I feel great atm, and I passed a
    > treadmill stress test a few years ago.
    >
    > Please don't worry about me. I'm disgustingly fit - good weight,
    > eating well, plenty of exercise; and a doc and an emergency hospital
    > not far away if I'm being an idiot anyway : )
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25


    If I may add a cautionary remark to Kate's---remember Jim Fix.
    --
    Martha T2 Canada
    1500mg. Metformin, 4mg. Avandia


  14. #14
    Uncle Enrico Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    bgl wrote:

    > Besides, they (usually, I think) use the (220-age) as the "max" and that may
    > not be at all what your real max is. I know I run "higher" than my HRM
    > thinks is in the 60-85% range & have no trouble with that. I'm often over
    > "100%". I may be breathing hard but I'm not "in distress."
    >


    My Polar uses the 220-age calc., but my on-demand Mio uses the RHR
    (resting heart rate) and dispenses with the birthdate.

  15. #15
    Chris Malcolm Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Nicky <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 16:29:13 -0600, Tiger_Lily <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    >>he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    >>treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    >>happening with your heart!
    >>
    >>please???


    > I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    > climbing a mountain. Honest! But I feel great atm, and I passed a
    > treadmill stress test a few years ago.


    But it doesn't sound as if you could get anywhere near passing one
    now. A recent change in cardiovascular performance of that size is
    something that ought to be checked. It's precisely climbing a hill or
    doing a graded full treadmill test that checks out the steady-state
    max capacity of the system. Doing all kinds of strenuous things that
    don't use the big leg muscles and don't last that long simply won't
    get there, and you'll feel fine.

    You may well be fine of course. But you have described symptoms which
    could be due to something which could quite quickly get a lot
    worse. I've known a few people with symptoms like yours who eventually
    got badgered into seeing a doc. Who booked them for an immediate
    cardiology test and *insisted* they cancel anything conflicting with the
    appointment. Luckily they were all ok. But I do get the impression
    that a recent drop in cardiovascular performance is something it's
    important to get checked out sooner rather than later.

    I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]


  16. #16
    Tiger_Lily Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Chris Malcolm wrote:
    > Nicky <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 16:29:13 -0600, Tiger_Lily <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>> now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    >>> he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    >>> treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    >>> happening with your heart!
    >>>
    >>> please???

    >
    >> I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    >> climbing a mountain. Honest! But I feel great atm, and I passed a
    >> treadmill stress test a few years ago.

    >
    > But it doesn't sound as if you could get anywhere near passing one
    > now. A recent change in cardiovascular performance of that size is
    > something that ought to be checked. It's precisely climbing a hill or
    > doing a graded full treadmill test that checks out the steady-state
    > max capacity of the system. Doing all kinds of strenuous things that
    > don't use the big leg muscles and don't last that long simply won't
    > get there, and you'll feel fine.
    >
    > You may well be fine of course. But you have described symptoms which
    > could be due to something which could quite quickly get a lot
    > worse. I've known a few people with symptoms like yours who eventually
    > got badgered into seeing a doc. Who booked them for an immediate
    > cardiology test and *insisted* they cancel anything conflicting with the
    > appointment. Luckily they were all ok. But I do get the impression
    > that a recent drop in cardiovascular performance is something it's
    > important to get checked out sooner rather than later.
    >
    > I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    > here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    > to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    > happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...
    >

    by time i convinced hubby to 'have that seen' he was put on the 'urgent'
    list for an angiogram the next week, and he was in the surgeon's office
    another week later........... he was told they would schedule surgery
    for him but if ANYTHING happened, he was to go to ER and let them know
    he was on the 'urgent' list for his double by-pass surgery

    thank goodness he's alive today!

    --
    kate
    type 1 since 1987
    www.diabetic-chat.org
    www.diabetic-talk.org
    http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/n...diagnosed.html

  17. #17
    Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    convicted neighbor Kate (Tiger_Lily) wrote:
    > convicted friend Chris Malcolm wrote:
    > > neighbor Nicky <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> convicted neighbor Kate (Tiger_Lily <[email protected]>) wrote:

    > >
    > >>> now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    > >>> he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    > >>> treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    > >>> happening with your heart!
    > >>>
    > >>> please???

    > >
    > >> I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    > >> climbing a mountain. Honest! But I feel great atm, and I passed a
    > >> treadmill stress test a few years ago.

    > >
    > > But it doesn't sound as if you could get anywhere near passing one
    > > now. A recent change in cardiovascular performance of that size is
    > > something that ought to be checked. It's precisely climbing a hill or
    > > doing a graded full treadmill test that checks out the steady-state
    > > max capacity of the system. Doing all kinds of strenuous things that
    > > don't use the big leg muscles and don't last that long simply won't
    > > get there, and you'll feel fine.
    > >
    > > You may well be fine of course. But you have described symptoms which
    > > could be due to something which could quite quickly get a lot
    > > worse. I've known a few people with symptoms like yours who eventually
    > > got badgered into seeing a doc. Who booked them for an immediate
    > > cardiology test and *insisted* they cancel anything conflicting with the
    > > appointment. Luckily they were all ok. But I do get the impression
    > > that a recent drop in cardiovascular performance is something it's
    > > important to get checked out sooner rather than later.
    > >
    > > I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    > > here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    > > to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    > > happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...
    > >

    > by time i convinced hubby to 'have that seen' he was put on the 'urgent'
    > list for an angiogram the next week, and he was in the surgeon's office
    > another week later........... he was told they would schedule surgery
    > for him but if ANYTHING happened, he was to go to ER and let them know
    > he was on the 'urgent' list for his double by-pass surgery
    >
    > thank goodness he's alive today!


    Adonai is good :-)

    Many thanks, much praise, and all the glory to Adonai for His sparing
    your husband and for His sparing dear Chris.

    Laus Deo ! ! !

    Be hungrier, which is truly healthier:

    http://groups.google.com/group/sci.m...d4e30704307e7?

    Marana tha

    Prayerfully in the awesome name of our Messiah, Adonai Jeshua,

    Andrew <><
    --
    http://groups.google.com/group/sci.m...8812d72ab4e17?

  18. #18
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On 1 Sep 2008 15:59:52 GMT, Chris Malcolm <cam@holyrood[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    >here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    >to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    >happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...


    Oh, OK, I'll go! Can't be this week, too busy getting the kids back to
    school, but I'll skip a session at the gym and go next week.

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  19. #19
    Tiger_Lily Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Nicky wrote:
    > On 1 Sep 2008 15:59:52 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    >> here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    >> to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    >> happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...

    >
    > Oh, OK, I'll go! Can't be this week, too busy getting the kids back to
    > school, but I'll skip a session at the gym and go next week.
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25


    oh, thank you Nicky!

    i can stop being worried!

    --
    kate
    type 1 since 1987
    www.diabetic-chat.org
    www.diabetic-talk.org
    http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/n...diagnosed.html

  20. #20
    MI Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?




    On 9/1/08 1:14 PM, in article [email protected],
    "Tiger_Lily" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Nicky wrote:
    >> On 1 Sep 2008 15:59:52 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    >>> here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    >>> to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    >>> happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...

    >>
    >> Oh, OK, I'll go! Can't be this week, too busy getting the kids back to
    >> school, but I'll skip a session at the gym and go next week.
    >>
    >> Nicky.
    >> T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    >> D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    >> Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

    >
    > oh, thank you Nicky!
    >
    > i can stop being worried!


    Me, too!

    --
    Martha T2 Canada
    1500mg. Metformin, 4mg. Avandia


  21. #21
    bgl Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    "Uncle Enrico" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:xqUuk.21255$[email protected]..
    > bgl wrote:
    >
    >> Besides, they (usually, I think) use the (220-age) as the "max" and
    >> that may not be at all what your real max is. I know I run "higher"
    >> than my HRM thinks is in the 60-85% range & have no trouble with
    >> that. I'm often over "100%". I may be breathing hard but I'm not "in
    >> distress."
    >>

    >
    > My Polar uses the 220-age calc., but my on-demand Mio uses the RHR
    > (resting heart rate) and dispenses with the birthdate.


    My Garmin records the max & ave HR for each lap, which I look at later
    just for interest. But I can see the "right now" HR at any time along
    the way -- "no wonder I feel like I'm working hard up this hill -- I AM"
    or "I really am taking it a bit easy, not just feeling like I am."
    I'm more careful in hot weather with not trying to push it.
    bj





  22. #22
    John C. Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Aug 31, 6:29*pm, Tiger_Lily <m...@privacy.net> wrote:
    > Nicky wrote:
    > > On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:04:26 -0700 (PDT), "John C."
    > > <jcarne...@verizon.net> wrote:

    >
    > >> I'd see a doc about that Nicky. I walk quite a bit and uphill, while I
    > >> do start breathing a bit heavier, it doesn't pose any major problems.

    >
    > > Thanks for the replies, guys. I had a minor heart attack in 2000
    > > following a car crash, and had a Bruce protocol stress test and an MRI
    > > 3? years ago, and was cleared of residual heart issues then. Right
    > > now, apart from walking uphill I feel absolutely great - I'd feel a
    > > fraud going in to a doc's office and claiming a problem. I promise I
    > > will if it starts to interfere with my life outside my mountain
    > > walking holidays!

    >
    > > Michelle's minor muscle theory is interesting - I also strained the
    > > ligament on the inside of my right knee on holiday, which is
    > > definitely a minor muscle related prob. I've just signed up for a new
    > > gym - the dojo's opened one - and have acquired a hulk of a personal
    > > trainer with sports physio expertise, I'll ask him to add
    > > quad-stabilising muscles to my programme.

    >
    > > Chris, hubby says you're quite right about half-walking, half-running
    > > downhill being easier - and if he didn't have to wait around for his
    > > womenfolk, he'd be able to do it more We bought him a cheapy
    > > walking stick and had to leave it in Spain - we did cabin baggage
    > > only, they have a thing about pointy sticks. As you say, it definitely
    > > feels better, but probably isn't doing him any favours.

    >
    > > Thanks again,

    >
    > > Nicky.
    > > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > > Last A1c 5.4% *BMI 25

    >
    > no no no no no
    >
    > now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    > he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    > treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    > happening with your heart!
    >
    > please???
    >
    > --
    > kate
    > type 1 since 1987www.diabetic-chat.orgwww.diabetic-talk.orghttp://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/newly%20diagnosed.html- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Gotta agree with Kate, most heartily (pun intended). An ounce of
    prevention and all that.

    My cardiologist has told me to call him any time about any question.
    He said the most foolish question is the one unasked.

    John C.

  23. #23
    John C. Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Sep 1, 8:12*am, Nicky <ukc802466...@btconnect.com> wrote:
    > On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 16:29:13 -0600, Tiger_Lily <m...@privacy.net> wrote:
    > >now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    > >he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    > >treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    > >happening with your heart!

    >
    > >please???

    >
    > I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    > climbing a mountain. Honest! But I feel great atm, and I passed a
    > treadmill stress test a few years ago.
    >
    > Please don't worry about me. I'm disgustingly fit


    So was Jim Fixx. Who wrote a book on running. He died suddenly at 52
    after a run. He had no symptoms yet had advanced atherosclerosis.

    John C.

  24. #24
    Trinkwasser Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Mon, 01 Sep 2008 20:47:44 +0100, Nicky <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 1 Sep 2008 15:59:52 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    >>here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    >>to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    >>happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...

    >
    >Oh, OK, I'll go! Can't be this week, too busy getting the kids back to
    >school, but I'll skip a session at the gym and go next week.


    Be well worth it, even if only for peace of mind.

    Have you noticed anything else, like water retention?

    Mother has extreme difficulty with hills nowadays, the problem is
    mainly being 93 - she has heart failure, her kidneys are iffy and she
    has COPD - and we're having problems with water retention, tweaking
    her bumetanide dose serves to shift the fluid from ankles to gut and
    back but not much else.

    If you haven't got any other such systemic symptoms it could be
    something more local, either way I'd feel a lot better when you get
    seen to!

  25. #25
    Marcia Masterson Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?


    "John C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Sep 1, 8:12 am, Nicky <ukc802466...@btconnect.com> wrote:
    > On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 16:29:13 -0600, Tiger_Lily <m...@privacy.net> wrote:
    > >now is the time to tell your Dr about the difficulty you are having so
    > >he can decide to send you to the cardiologist, who can book the
    > >treadmill stress test or the thalium stress test to see what is
    > >happening with your heart!

    >
    > >please???

    >
    > I would go like a shot if I felt any discomfort except when I'm
    > climbing a mountain. Honest! But I feel great atm, and I passed a
    > treadmill stress test a few years ago.
    >
    > Please don't worry about me. I'm disgustingly fit


    So was Jim Fixx. Who wrote a book on running. He died suddenly at 52
    after a run. He had no symptoms yet had advanced atherosclerosis.

    John C.

    Don't assume it has to be a heart problem. Lung problems are almost as
    likely to cause these difficulties with severe consequences. In any event,
    go to your doctor to be evaluated.



  26. #26
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    It doesn't if you have four legs and low to the ground like my dog.

    Andy

  27. #27
    hemyd Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    "Nicky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:mm1mb4pefi85i020f0mi8fugpd8c5dlg6q[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:04:26 -0700 (PDT), "John C."
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I'd see a doc about that Nicky. I walk quite a bit and uphill, while I
    >>do start breathing a bit heavier, it doesn't pose any major problems.

    >
    > Thanks for the replies, guys. I had a minor heart attack in 2000
    > following a car crash, and had a Bruce protocol stress test and an MRI
    > 3? years ago, and was cleared of residual heart issues then. Right
    > now, apart from walking uphill I feel absolutely great - I'd feel a
    > fraud going in to a doc's office and claiming a problem. I promise I
    > will if it starts to interfere with my life outside my mountain
    > walking holidays!
    >
    > Michelle's minor muscle theory is interesting - I also strained the
    > ligament on the inside of my right knee on holiday, which is
    > definitely a minor muscle related prob. I've just signed up for a new
    > gym - the dojo's opened one - and have acquired a hulk of a personal
    > trainer with sports physio expertise, I'll ask him to add
    > quad-stabilising muscles to my programme.
    >
    > Chris, hubby says you're quite right about half-walking, half-running
    > downhill being easier - and if he didn't have to wait around for his
    > womenfolk, he'd be able to do it more We bought him a cheapy
    > walking stick and had to leave it in Spain - we did cabin baggage
    > only, they have a thing about pointy sticks. As you say, it definitely
    > feels better, but probably isn't doing him any favours.
    >
    > Thanks again,
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25


    G'day Nicky,

    It's my first post for a while, because of my ISP news server dying for many
    weeks. I tried to send a personal email, but you obviously never received
    it. I have friends who found their arteries clogged, very close to a massive
    heart attack, an who have had symptoms varying from being out of breath and
    tired at some times, to being quite all right at other times. When we feel
    good we tend to go into denial, as we diabetics so very well know about
    others. I understand the reluctance to see a cardiologist, but please do so,
    even if you feel good now.

    And, by the way, than you once again for your advice on getting more
    sunshine, thus Vitamin D, to stop my headaches. They have decreased a lot.

    Henry Mydlarz



  28. #28
    Robert Miles Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?


    "hemyd" <myd!!![email protected]> wrote in message
    news:48bee831$0$18430$[email protected] u...
    > "Nicky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:04:26 -0700 (PDT), "John C."
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'd see a doc about that Nicky. I walk quite a bit and uphill, while I
    >>>do start breathing a bit heavier, it doesn't pose any major problems.

    >>
    >> Thanks for the replies, guys. I had a minor heart attack in 2000
    >> following a car crash, and had a Bruce protocol stress test and an MRI
    >> 3? years ago, and was cleared of residual heart issues then. Right
    >> now, apart from walking uphill I feel absolutely great - I'd feel a
    >> fraud going in to a doc's office and claiming a problem. I promise I
    >> will if it starts to interfere with my life outside my mountain
    >> walking holidays!
    >>
    >> Michelle's minor muscle theory is interesting - I also strained the
    >> ligament on the inside of my right knee on holiday, which is
    >> definitely a minor muscle related prob. I've just signed up for a new
    >> gym - the dojo's opened one - and have acquired a hulk of a personal
    >> trainer with sports physio expertise, I'll ask him to add
    >> quad-stabilising muscles to my programme.
    >>
    >> Chris, hubby says you're quite right about half-walking, half-running
    >> downhill being easier - and if he didn't have to wait around for his
    >> womenfolk, he'd be able to do it more We bought him a cheapy
    >> walking stick and had to leave it in Spain - we did cabin baggage
    >> only, they have a thing about pointy sticks. As you say, it definitely
    >> feels better, but probably isn't doing him any favours.
    >>
    >> Thanks again,
    >>
    >> Nicky.
    >> T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    >> D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    >> Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

    >
    > G'day Nicky,
    >
    > It's my first post for a while, because of my ISP news server dying for
    > many weeks. I tried to send a personal email, but you obviously never
    > received it. I have friends who found their arteries clogged, very close
    > to a massive heart attack, an who have had symptoms varying from being out
    > of breath and tired at some times, to being quite all right at other
    > times. When we feel good we tend to go into denial, as we diabetics so
    > very well know about others. I understand the reluctance to see a
    > cardiologist, but please do so, even if you feel good now.
    >
    > And, by the way, than you once again for your advice on getting more
    > sunshine, thus Vitamin D, to stop my headaches. They have decreased a lot.
    >
    > Henry Mydlarz

    I see that you're using Outlook Express. At least some versions of it can
    handle
    connecting to more than one newsgroups server at a time. You may want to
    try this one during such failures:

    http://www.motzarella.org/

    If you're also interested in binaries newsgroups, you may want to try this
    cheap but not quite free server that offers binaries:

    http://www.teranews.com/

    Expect Tera News to be somewhat slow about starting to let you post
    anything, though.



  29. #29
    Trinkwasser Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Tue, 02 Sep 2008 19:01:53 +0100, Trinkwasser
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 01 Sep 2008 20:47:44 +0100, Nicky <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On 1 Sep 2008 15:59:52 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>I could of course be biassed by my own rather scary personal experience
    >>>here. I felt fine, and thought I was pretty fit for my age, right up
    >>>to the minute I collapsed in the street with a heart attack. As it
    >>>happens while walking up a small but very steep hill...

    >>
    >>Oh, OK, I'll go! Can't be this week, too busy getting the kids back to
    >>school, but I'll skip a session at the gym and go next week.

    >
    >Be well worth it, even if only for peace of mind.
    >
    >Have you noticed anything else, like water retention?
    >
    >Mother has extreme difficulty with hills nowadays, the problem is
    >mainly being 93 - she has heart failure, her kidneys are iffy and she
    >has COPD - and we're having problems with water retention, tweaking
    >her bumetanide dose serves to shift the fluid from ankles to gut and
    >back but not much else.
    >
    >If you haven't got any other such systemic symptoms it could be
    >something more local, either way I'd feel a lot better when you get
    >seen to!


    Something else I thought of, you're used to living not much above sea
    level, what altitude were you at? And did the effect wear off over
    time? I can remember getting very knackered walking around Gavarnie
    for the first day or two, after which I acclimatised and was able to
    make it right up to the Port De Gavarnie and back (pausing only to
    urinate in Spain)

    And the same if not worse in the Alps, it takes a finite time to
    acclimatise to the thinner air.

  30. #30
    W. Baker Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Nicky <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I have a puzzle for you. Right now, I am fit, a good weight, and used
    : to doing several miles' walking a day plus twice-weekly karate lessons
    : for an hour. I eat low carb, and have done for years; the rest of my
    : family eat my meals with an optional carb side.

    : I've just some back from a mountain walking holiday in Spain. Walking
    : on the (relatively) flat or downhill was no problem whatsoever. I did
    : several hours-long, fast walks with no bother at all. Walking uphill
    : for even the smallest distance, OTOH, causes my thighs to cramp, I get
    : breathless, and turn an interesting shade of purple. Hubby has exactly
    : the opposite reaction - he hates walking downhill, because he finds
    : he's slower, uses more energy, and puts his joints more at risk.

    : We have literally split mountains in half - I'll go up the ski-lift
    : whilst he walks up with one kid, then I'll walk down with the other
    : whilst he uses the down ticket. This time, mutter, the ski lifts were
    : out for maintenance - so we both had to walk in both directions, and
    : it made our different reactions to the mountain very clear. However,
    : we get pretty well the same reactions if we walk up and down a baby
    : hill at home.

    : Who's normal? What's causing my problems? Is there anything I can do
    : about it? Beach holidays are just not going to cut it... and trust me,
    : it's not underdeveloped quads.

    : Nicky.

    Nicky, \\

    It is almost a week now since your original post. HAVE YOU SEEN THE
    DOCTOR?

    I hate to yell at you, but I am worried about you-

    Wendy- kind of your virtual mother:-)

  31. #31
    Alice Faber Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Trinkwasser <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Something else I thought of, you're used to living not much above sea
    > level, what altitude were you at? And did the effect wear off over
    > time? I can remember getting very knackered walking around Gavarnie
    > for the first day or two, after which I acclimatised and was able to
    > make it right up to the Port De Gavarnie and back (pausing only to
    > urinate in Spain)
    >
    > And the same if not worse in the Alps, it takes a finite time to
    > acclimatise to the thinner air.


    I thought of that also. I live near sea level. The first time I visited
    friends in Utah, we did a day picnic up in one of the canyons near Salt
    Lake, with an elevation above 7,000 ft above sea level. I had no problem
    walking a mile or two around a lake, on a nearly level trail. However,
    there was an elevation gain of no more than 15 feet between the parking
    area and our picnic area. And that short walk (probably 50 feet in
    total) was absolutely exhausting, even when I wasn't carrying my share
    of picnic supplies. But it was a global exhaustion, and I didn't feel
    particularly jelly-legged.

    --
    "[xxx] has very definite opinions, and does not suffer fools lightly.
    This, apparently, upsets the fools."
    ---BB cuts to the pith of a flame-fest

  32. #32
    Tiger_Lily Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    Alice Faber wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Trinkwasser <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Something else I thought of, you're used to living not much above sea
    >> level, what altitude were you at? And did the effect wear off over
    >> time? I can remember getting very knackered walking around Gavarnie
    >> for the first day or two, after which I acclimatised and was able to
    >> make it right up to the Port De Gavarnie and back (pausing only to
    >> urinate in Spain)
    >>
    >> And the same if not worse in the Alps, it takes a finite time to
    >> acclimatise to the thinner air.

    >
    > I thought of that also. I live near sea level. The first time I visited
    > friends in Utah, we did a day picnic up in one of the canyons near Salt
    > Lake, with an elevation above 7,000 ft above sea level. I had no problem
    > walking a mile or two around a lake, on a nearly level trail. However,
    > there was an elevation gain of no more than 15 feet between the parking
    > area and our picnic area. And that short walk (probably 50 feet in
    > total) was absolutely exhausting, even when I wasn't carrying my share
    > of picnic supplies. But it was a global exhaustion, and I didn't feel
    > particularly jelly-legged.
    >

    hubby noticed a significant difference in his breathing problems and
    heart problems when he was at sea level.......... they nearly
    disappeared for him

    returning to 6,500 ft at home made his symptoms worsen again

    --
    kate
    type 1 since 1987
    www.diabetic-chat.org
    www.diabetic-talk.org
    http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/n...diagnosed.html

  33. #33
    MI Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?




    On 9/5/08 6:15 PM, in article [email protected],
    "Tiger_Lily" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Alice Faber wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Trinkwasser <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Something else I thought of, you're used to living not much above sea
    >>> level, what altitude were you at? And did the effect wear off over
    >>> time? I can remember getting very knackered walking around Gavarnie
    >>> for the first day or two, after which I acclimatised and was able to
    >>> make it right up to the Port De Gavarnie and back (pausing only to
    >>> urinate in Spain)
    >>>
    >>> And the same if not worse in the Alps, it takes a finite time to
    >>> acclimatise to the thinner air.

    >>
    >> I thought of that also. I live near sea level. The first time I visited
    >> friends in Utah, we did a day picnic up in one of the canyons near Salt
    >> Lake, with an elevation above 7,000 ft above sea level. I had no problem
    >> walking a mile or two around a lake, on a nearly level trail. However,
    >> there was an elevation gain of no more than 15 feet between the parking
    >> area and our picnic area. And that short walk (probably 50 feet in
    >> total) was absolutely exhausting, even when I wasn't carrying my share
    >> of picnic supplies. But it was a global exhaustion, and I didn't feel
    >> particularly jelly-legged.
    >>

    > hubby noticed a significant difference in his breathing problems and
    > heart problems when he was at sea level.......... they nearly
    > disappeared for him
    >
    > returning to 6,500 ft at home made his symptoms worsen again


    Good point. My Mum was flown out of Alberta and the doctors told her never
    to come back because her heart couldn't take it. We used to take her to
    Whistler and we had to stop taking her there. But, Nicky, note the problems
    were caused by her heart.

    We're going to keep nagging until you tell us you have seen the
    cardiologist.
    --
    Martha T2 Canada
    1500mg. Metformin, 4mg. Avandia


  34. #34
    Trinkwasser Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 02:22:05 GMT, MI <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    >On 9/5/08 6:15 PM, in article 6ie3tvFq34evU2@mid.indivi[email protected],
    >"Tiger_Lily" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Alice Faber wrote:
    >>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> Trinkwasser <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Something else I thought of, you're used to living not much above sea
    >>>> level, what altitude were you at? And did the effect wear off over
    >>>> time? I can remember getting very knackered walking around Gavarnie
    >>>> for the first day or two, after which I acclimatised and was able to
    >>>> make it right up to the Port De Gavarnie and back (pausing only to
    >>>> urinate in Spain)
    >>>>
    >>>> And the same if not worse in the Alps, it takes a finite time to
    >>>> acclimatise to the thinner air.
    >>>
    >>> I thought of that also. I live near sea level. The first time I visited
    >>> friends in Utah, we did a day picnic up in one of the canyons near Salt
    >>> Lake, with an elevation above 7,000 ft above sea level. I had no problem
    >>> walking a mile or two around a lake, on a nearly level trail. However,
    >>> there was an elevation gain of no more than 15 feet between the parking
    >>> area and our picnic area. And that short walk (probably 50 feet in
    >>> total) was absolutely exhausting, even when I wasn't carrying my share
    >>> of picnic supplies. But it was a global exhaustion, and I didn't feel
    >>> particularly jelly-legged.
    >>>

    >> hubby noticed a significant difference in his breathing problems and
    >> heart problems when he was at sea level.......... they nearly
    >> disappeared for him
    >>
    >> returning to 6,500 ft at home made his symptoms worsen again

    >
    >Good point. My Mum was flown out of Alberta and the doctors told her never
    >to come back because her heart couldn't take it. We used to take her to
    >Whistler and we had to stop taking her there. But, Nicky, note the problems
    >were caused by her heart.
    >
    >We're going to keep nagging until you tell us you have seen the
    >cardiologist.


    Yes, that's what I was thinking, something of an early warning perhaps

    <crosses fingers for Nicky>

  35. #35
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 15:34:33 +0100, Trinkwasser
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yes, that's what I was thinking, something of an early warning perhaps
    >
    ><crosses fingers for Nicky>


    OK, you heavy mob, you can stop nagging - I went on Thursday morning,
    had a bunch of blood tests, and an ECG. The technician thought the ECG
    looked fine, but I won't hear back from the specialist until the end
    of next week.

    Now I have a much bigger (although possibly related) problem - I went
    to the gym last night to let my new hulk of a personal trainer do leg
    work with me for an hour, then went straight on to a karate lesson
    with a sensei who thinks we all need to be gotten fitter after our
    holidays. I'm having difficulty going down the step in front of my
    house <whimper...> - so maybe all this is because my quads were in
    much worse shape than I thought!

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  36. #36
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Thu, 4 Sep 2008 05:40:33 +1000, "hemyd" <myd!!![email protected]>
    wrote:

    >It's my first post for a while, because of my ISP news server dying for many
    >weeks. I tried to send a personal email, but you obviously never received
    >it.


    Oh! I did, Henry, and replied - I wonder what happened there!

    >And, by the way, than you once again for your advice on getting more
    >sunshine, thus Vitamin D, to stop my headaches. They have decreased a lot.


    Cool

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  37. #37
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Fri, 5 Sep 2008 20:51:47 +0000 (UTC), "W. Baker" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >It is almost a week now since your original post. HAVE YOU SEEN THE
    >DOCTOR?
    >
    >I hate to yell at you, but I am worried about you-
    >
    >Wendy- kind of your virtual mother:-)


    Yes, Ma - results end of next week :P

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  38. #38
    Nicky Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?

    On Fri, 05 Sep 2008 18:55:09 +0100, Trinkwasser
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Something else I thought of, you're used to living not much above sea
    >level, what altitude were you at? And did the effect wear off over
    >time? I can remember getting very knackered walking around Gavarnie
    >for the first day or two, after which I acclimatised and was able to
    >make it right up to the Port De Gavarnie and back (pausing only to
    >urinate in Spain)


    ROFL - we did that too, sad or what

    Maybe. But the house was only at 720m.

    Nicky.
    T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25

  39. #39
    MI Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?




    On 9/6/08 10:57 AM, in article [email protected],
    "Nicky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 15:34:33 +0100, Trinkwasser
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Yes, that's what I was thinking, something of an early warning perhaps
    >>
    >> <crosses fingers for Nicky>

    >
    > OK, you heavy mob, you can stop nagging - I went on Thursday morning,
    > had a bunch of blood tests, and an ECG. The technician thought the ECG
    > looked fine, but I won't hear back from the specialist until the end
    > of next week.
    >
    > Now I have a much bigger (although possibly related) problem - I went
    > to the gym last night to let my new hulk of a personal trainer do leg
    > work with me for an hour, then went straight on to a karate lesson
    > with a sensei who thinks we all need to be gotten fitter after our
    > holidays. I'm having difficulty going down the step in front of my
    > house <whimper...> - so maybe all this is because my quads were in
    > much worse shape than I thought!
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25


    Glad to hear all is looking good. Still glad we all nagged you. Now you know
    that things aren't a real problem. I hedge until we hear the results.
    --
    Martha T2 Canada
    1500mg. Metformin, 4mg. Avandia


  40. #40
    Michelle C Guest

    Default Re: Why does walking uphill pose such a problem?


    "Nicky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 06 Sep 2008 15:34:33 +0100, Trinkwasser
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Yes, that's what I was thinking, something of an early warning perhaps
    >>
    >><crosses fingers for Nicky>

    >
    > OK, you heavy mob, you can stop nagging - I went on Thursday morning,
    > had a bunch of blood tests, and an ECG. The technician thought the ECG
    > looked fine, but I won't hear back from the specialist until the end
    > of next week.
    >
    > Now I have a much bigger (although possibly related) problem - I went
    > to the gym last night to let my new hulk of a personal trainer do leg
    > work with me for an hour, then went straight on to a karate lesson
    > with a sensei who thinks we all need to be gotten fitter after our
    > holidays. I'm having difficulty going down the step in front of my
    > house <whimper...> - so maybe all this is because my quads were in
    > much worse shape than I thought!
    >
    > Nicky.
    > T2 dx 05/04 + underactive thyroid
    > D&E, 100ug thyroxine
    > Last A1c 5.4% BMI 25


    Hi Nicky,

    Glad to hear all the heart reports look good so far. :-) Okay, so I wasn't
    one of the naggers on this point, but you're an important part of this
    group, Nicky. We all care.

    It's sounds like you're getting the quad workout from hell, but one of these
    days you'll climb those hills with no problem. ;-) Now, get hubby to give
    those quads a little massage.
    --
    Best regards,
    Michelle C., T2
    diet & exercise
    BMI 21.5



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