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Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?
  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    Hi !

    I am thinking of making tofu.

    Regular coagulants for the soy protein to make tofu are Calcium
    Sulphate (gypsum), Magnesium Chloride (nigari), or Magnesium Sulphate
    (epsom).

    My chemistry is really bad, so I need help. I am thinking of
    substituting the Calcium or Magnesium in the coagulant process with
    Potassium.

    My question is, can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate
    (potash) to be the coagulant for tofu ?

    Would it be possible?

    Would it be poisonous?

  2. #2
    D. C. Sessions Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulant for making Tofu ?

    In message <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > Hi !
    >
    > I am thinking of making tofu.
    >
    > Regular coagulants for the soy protein to make tofu are Calcium
    > Sulphate (gypsum), Magnesium Chloride (nigari), or Magnesium Sulphate
    > (epsom).
    >
    > My chemistry is really bad, so I need help. I am thinking of
    > substituting the Calcium or Magnesium in the coagulant process with
    > Potassium.
    >
    > My question is, can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate
    > (potash) to be the coagulant for tofu ?
    >
    > Would it be possible?


    I wouldn't bet on much coagulation, but I'm not a chemist.
    Keep in mind that Ca and Mg are both column II; K is
    column I.

    > Would it be poisonous?


    Not in reasonable amounts, and you'd have to use a LOT
    of K to be dangerous -- enough that it would taste nasty.

    --
    | **** happens. Sometimes it happens to you. |
    +--- D. C. Sessions <[email protected]> ---+

  3. #3
    Salmon Egg Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulant for making Tofu ?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Hi !
    >
    > I am thinking of making tofu.
    >
    > Regular coagulants for the soy protein to make tofu are Calcium
    > Sulphate (gypsum), Magnesium Chloride (nigari), or Magnesium Sulphate
    > (epsom).
    >
    > My chemistry is really bad, so I need help. I am thinking of
    > substituting the Calcium or Magnesium in the coagulant process with
    > Potassium.
    >
    > My question is, can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate
    > (potash) to be the coagulant for tofu ?
    >
    > Would it be possible?
    >
    > Would it be poisonous?


    I am not a professional chemist but I think that I can help some.

    The purpose of the salt is to discharge any residual charge on the
    colloidal particles. This removes the repulsive forces and allows the
    particles coalesce into larger particles (coagulation). Almost any
    electrolyte solution should do that.

    Potassium ion is not highly toxic, but it can interfere with the
    functioning of nerves including those keeping the heart beating
    properly. At the least, I would want to know how much potassium is left
    in the tofu and how big a dose you get. Also run it by your doctor or
    pharmacist to find out how much trouble you can get into. Certainly,
    large amounts of the other substances you mention can get you into
    trouble. It just depends on the dose.

    Gypsum is not highly soluble. That would indicate to me that you do not
    need high concentrations to coagulate. Certainly, epsom salts is not a
    problem in lw doses. Larger doses will keep you visiting the bathroom. I
    presume really large doses are harmful.

    I believe that potash is potassium carbonate, not the sulfate.

    Bill

  4. #4
    pg Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as thecoagulant for making Tofu ?

    On Apr 19, 10:02 pm, Yabahoobs <chendrik...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Apr 19, 8:01 pm, "D. C. Sessions" <d...@lumbercartel.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > In message <ba292def-d494-4746-8f8e-73d2d1e3b...@y18g2000pre.googlegroups.com>, hsyq...@gmail.com wrote:

    >
    > > > Hi !

    >
    > > > I am thinking of makingtofu.

    >
    > > > Regular coagulants for the soy protein to maketofuare Calcium
    > > > Sulphate (gypsum), Magnesium Chloride (nigari), or Magnesium Sulphate
    > > > (epsom).

    >
    > > > My chemistry is really bad, so I need help. I am thinking of
    > > > substituting the Calcium or Magnesium in thecoagulantprocess with
    > > >Potassium.

    >
    > > > My question is, can I usePotassiumChloride orPotassiumSulphate
    > > > (potash) to be thecoagulantfortofu?

    >
    > > > Would it be possible?

    >
    > > I wouldn't bet on much coagulation, but I'm not a chemist.
    > > Keep in mind that Ca and Mg are both column II; K is
    > > column I.

    >
    > > > Would it be poisonous?

    >
    > > Not in reasonable amounts, and you'd have to use a LOT
    > > of K to be dangerous -- enough that it would taste nasty.

    >
    > > --
    > > | **** happens. Sometimes it happens to you. |
    > > +--- D. C. Sessions <d...@lumbercartel.com> ---+

    >
    > KCl is highly poisonous. Don't use it.



    From Wikipedia --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poison

    "Intravenous injection of an unnaturally high concentration of
    potassium chloride, such as in the execution of prisoners in parts of
    the United States, quickly stops the heart by eliminating the cell
    potential necessary for muscle contraction."

    Keywords above are "Intravenous Injection" & "Unnaturally High
    Concentration"

    Unless all the potassium chloride got into the blood, and that guy
    eats a truck load of tofu, I don't think his heart is going to stop
    contracting.



  5. #5
    Bob M Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as thecoagulant for making Tofu ?

    The coagulation of the "vegetable casein" protein which forms tofu
    depends on a di or trivalent positively charged ion linking the
    protein molecules together into a large molecular network. Only ones
    suitable for use in food are calcium and magnesium. But too much
    magnesium is a laxative this leaves calcium it is usually added as
    calcium sulphate or calcium chloride occasionally as calcium lactate
    or acetate.

    Bob M
    www.molab.co.nz

  6. #6
    [email protected] | Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as thecoagulant for making Tofu ?

    I'd think vinegar or a bit of heat would work to form soy curd as
    well.
    I'd avoid the potassium chemicals. I've tried the potassium based
    baking powders in the past and it alters the taste and not in
    a favorable way. Though this does indicate the nervous
    Nellies concerned that a trace of potassium will kill is
    overblown and reflects a lack of understanding of
    what is going to be eaten here that is the solid not the
    liquid. If one drinks pickle brine don't be surprised
    if one gets a trip to the ER for congestive heart failure
    due to the excess NaCl. Don't drink brine whether it
    contains Na+ or K+.

    Potash ash is crude potassium carbonate as I recall.

    I suppose potassium sulfate might work though the
    working end of the deal if it works would be the sulfate
    anion given it minus two charge. It likely would work.
    I'd rinse the curd. The remain dose of potassium should
    be pretty low, likely doing no more than replacing some
    of the K+ which is lost in the processing of the beans.

    The other issue would be the issue of the purity of
    the various proposed salts here and what else they
    might contain.

    Sample carefully in case I missed something and it
    is going to kill in larger doses ;-) Before you take
    your next breath ask your Doctor whether it is safe
    and whether it is good to continue. Hold that breath, now.



    hsyq...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi !
    >
    > I am thinking of making tofu.
    >
    > Regular coagulants for the soy protein to make tofu are Calcium
    > Sulphate (gypsum), Magnesium Chloride (nigari), or Magnesium Sulphate
    > (epsom).
    >
    > My chemistry is really bad, so I need help. I am thinking of
    > substituting the Calcium or Magnesium in the coagulant process with
    > Potassium.
    >
    > My question is, can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate
    > (potash) to be the coagulant for tofu ?
    >
    > Would it be possible?
    >
    > Would it be poisonous?


  7. #7
    D. C. Sessions Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulant for making Tofu ?

    In message <[email protected]>, [email protected] | wrote:

    > I'd avoid the potassium chemicals. I've tried the potassium based
    > baking powders in the past and it alters the taste and not in
    > a favorable way. Though this does indicate the nervous
    > Nellies concerned that a trace of potassium will kill is
    > overblown and reflects a lack of understanding of
    > what is going to be eaten here that is the solid not the
    > liquid. If one drinks pickle brine don't be surprised
    > if one gets a trip to the ER for congestive heart failure
    > due to the excess NaCl. Don't drink brine whether it
    > contains Na+ or K+.


    Let's keep things in perspective here. The RDA for
    potassium is 3000 mg. You can eat a potato without
    danger of dropping over from the potassium content.

    Morton "Lite Salt" is something like 40% potassium
    chloride. I use the stuff all the time as a supplement.

    --
    | **** happens. Sometimes it happens to you. |
    +--- D. C. Sessions <[email protected]> ---+

  8. #8
    Bill Penrose Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as thecoagulant for making Tofu ?

    On Apr 19, 7:14 pm, hsyq...@gmail.com wrote:
    > My question is, can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate
    > (potash) to be the coagulant for tofu ?


    No.

    Dangerous Bill



  9. #9
    Bill Penrose Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as thecoagulant for making Tofu ?

    On Apr 20, 8:10 am, "trigonometry1...@gmail.com |"
    <trigonometry1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > ...Though this does indicate the nervous
    > Nellies concerned that a trace of potassium will kill is
    > overblown


    Most people are okay, but certain people, or people taking certain
    blood pressure medicines can develop heart irregularities.

    But for the tofu thing, potassium is probably the last choice anyway.
    Buy some calcium capsules and empty them (or crush up some drywall if
    you want) and some epsom salts (magnesium sulfate).

    Dangerous Bill

  10. #10
    [email protected] | Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as thecoagulant for making Tofu ?

    Yes, it seems there are medical outliers but they shouldn't dictate
    what the rest of the population does. (I make this comment based
    on all the products that dangerous to some section of the population
    i.e. gluten, peanuts, corn, and so on.) For example, people on
    kidney dialysis are placed on restrict potassium diets and
    as other have mentioned some use KCL as salt substitute.
    Even at that as I pointed out, potassium sulphate would largely be
    washed
    away provided the curd is rinsed. Assuming this even works.

    Don't be silly.....crush drywall. Do you realize makers add
    anti-mold additives to the stuff. I won't even put the
    remainders from my dry wall work in hole in the garden, rather, I send
    it to the land fill in the next state.

    Bill Penrose wrote:
    > On Apr 20, 8:10 am, "trigonometry1...@gmail.com |"
    > <trigonometry1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > ...Though this does indicate the nervous
    > > Nellies concerned that a trace of potassium will kill is
    > > overblown

    >
    > Most people are okay, but certain people, or people taking certain
    > blood pressure medicines can develop heart irregularities.
    >
    > But for the tofu thing, potassium is probably the last choice anyway.
    > Buy some calcium capsules and empty them (or crush up some drywall if
    > you want) and some epsom salts (magnesium sulfate).
    >
    > Dangerous Bill


  11. #11
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi !
    >
    > I am thinking of making tofu.
    >
    > Regular coagulants for the soy protein to make tofu are Calcium
    > Sulphate (gypsum), Magnesium Chloride (nigari), or Magnesium Sulphate
    > (epsom).
    >
    > My chemistry is really bad, so I need help. I am thinking of
    > substituting the Calcium or Magnesium in the coagulant process with
    > Potassium.
    >
    > My question is, can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate
    > (potash) to be the coagulant for tofu ?
    >
    > Would it be possible?
    >
    > Would it be poisonous?


    I'd go for it if I knew how to make tofu. The worst that could
    happen is that it would taste bad. Can you make it from soy milk?

    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

  12. #12
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    Bob M wrote:
    > The coagulation of the "vegetable casein" protein which forms tofu
    > depends on a di or trivalent positively charged ion linking the
    > protein molecules together into a large molecular network. Only ones
    > suitable for use in food are calcium and magnesium. But too much
    > magnesium is a laxative this leaves calcium it is usually added as
    > calcium sulphate or calcium chloride occasionally as calcium lactate
    > or acetate.
    >
    > Bob M
    > www.molab.co.nz


    Do you know which soft drinks contain significant amounts of
    phosphoric acid?

    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

  13. #13
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    Bob M wrote:
    > The coagulation of the "vegetable casein" protein which forms tofu
    > depends on a di or trivalent positively charged ion linking the
    > protein molecules together into a large molecular network. Only ones
    > suitable for use in food are calcium and magnesium. But too much
    > magnesium is a laxative this leaves calcium it is usually added as
    > calcium sulphate or calcium chloride occasionally as calcium lactate
    > or acetate.
    >
    > Bob M
    > www.molab.co.nz


    By the way, Bob M has a discussion about phosphoric acid on his
    website which confuses me:
    http://www.molab.co.nz/pages/cola-osteoporosis.php . Any comments on
    how he gets "50%" -- and what he means by it?

    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

  14. #14
    Borek Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulant for making Tofu ?

    On Sat, 03 May 2008 23:13:56 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > By the way, Bob M has a discussion about phosphoric acid on his
    > website which confuses me:
    > http://www.molab.co.nz/pages/cola-osteoporosis.php . Any comments on
    > how he gets "50%" -- and what he means by it?


    You mean 50% like in 50% neutralization? It means nothing. To get pH 5.5
    you have to neutralize a little bit more than first proton, say 0.1M acid
    plus 0.105M NaOH. If the 50% refers to real 50% - you end with perfect
    pH=pKa2 buffer, that gives pH close to neutral (pKa2=7.2).

    Borek
    --
    http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=BATE&right=pH-calculator
    http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=Buffe...fer-calculator

  15. #15
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    Borek wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 May 2008 23:13:56 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> By the way, Bob M has a discussion about phosphoric acid on his
    >> website which confuses me:
    >> http://www.molab.co.nz/pages/cola-osteoporosis.php . Any comments on
    >> how he gets "50%" -- and what he means by it?

    >
    > You mean 50% like in 50% neutralization? It means nothing. To get pH 5.5
    > you have to neutralize a little bit more than first proton, say 0.1M acid
    > plus 0.105M NaOH. If the 50% refers to real 50% - you end with perfect
    > pH=pKa2 buffer, that gives pH close to neutral (pKa2=7.2).
    >
    > Borek


    This is still way over my head. Could you elaborate a little more?

    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

  16. #16
    Borek Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulant for making Tofu ?

    On Tue, 06 May 2008 08:38:03 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >>> By the way, Bob M has a discussion about phosphoric acid on his
    >>> website which confuses me:
    >>> http://www.molab.co.nz/pages/cola-osteoporosis.php . Any comments on
    >>> how he gets "50%" -- and what he means by it?

    >> You mean 50% like in 50% neutralization? It means nothing. To get pH
    >> 5.5 you have to neutralize a little bit more than first proton, say
    >> 0.1M acid plus 0.105M NaOH. If the 50% refers to real 50% - you end
    >> with perfect pH=pKa2 buffer, that gives pH close to neutral (pKa2=7.2).


    > This is still way over my head. Could you elaborate a little more?


    Very generally speaking, phosphoric acid neutralization goes like that:

    H3PO4 + 3NaOH -> Na3PO4 + H2O

    50% means that you add half the amount of NaOH required. This in turn
    means that you:
    1. Proceed completely with first step of neutralization, ie
    H3PO4 + NaOH -> NaH2PO4 + H2O
    2. Proceed 50% into the second step of neutralization:
    NaH2PO4 + NaOH = Na2HPO4 + H2O

    So, after 50% neutralization your solution is 50/50 H2PO4- and HPO4-2.
    This is a classic buffer solution, with pH described by so called
    Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, which in this particluar case takes form:

    pH = 7.2 + log([HPO4-2]/[H2PO4-])

    but we already know that [HPO4-2] = [H2PO4-] (remember, solution is
    50/50). That leaves us with

    pH = 7.2

    There are fine details omitted and hidden assumptions done so nitpickers
    can bash almost every phrase in this post, but no matter how the'll try,
    their final pH will be around 7 as well.

    To get solution with pH around 5.5 you have to neutralize first proton and
    add very small excess of base. I would call it 35% neutralization
    (assuming 100% is when the amount of base is three times that of acid, to
    account for the phosphoric acid "triprocity").

    Now, you can define 100% neutralization in terms of single proton - ie
    100% is when the reaction

    H3PO4 + NaOH -> NaH2PO4 + H2O

    is finished. That means full neutralization is 300%. This approach
    sometimes simplifies calculations. Still, 50% in this case is when you
    have 50/50 mixture af H3PO4 and H2PO4- - this is another buffer, with pH
    around 2.2. No matter how you try it is NOT 5.5.

    Browse pH calculation lectures at

    http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=pH-calculation&right=toc

    if you need more. Or play with pH calculator from

    http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=BATE&right=pH-calculator

    to see for yourself how the pH changes for different solutions. There isa
    30 day free trial so you can do it for free.

    Borek
    --
    http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=Buffe...fer-calculator

  17. #17
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    Borek wrote:
    > On Tue, 06 May 2008 08:38:03 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>>> By the way, Bob M has a discussion about phosphoric acid on his
    >>>> website which confuses me:
    >>>> http://www.molab.co.nz/pages/cola-osteoporosis.php . Any comments on
    >>>> how he gets "50%" -- and what he means by it?
    >>> You mean 50% like in 50% neutralization? It means nothing. To get pH
    >>> 5.5 you have to neutralize a little bit more than first proton, say
    >>> 0.1M acid plus 0.105M NaOH. If the 50% refers to real 50% - you end
    >>> with perfect pH=pKa2 buffer, that gives pH close to neutral (pKa2=7.2).

    >
    >> This is still way over my head. Could you elaborate a little more?

    >
    > Very generally speaking, phosphoric acid neutralization goes like that:
    >
    > H3PO4 + 3NaOH -> Na3PO4 + H2O
    >
    > 50% means that you add half the amount of NaOH required. This in turn
    > means that you:
    > 1. Proceed completely with first step of neutralization, ie
    > H3PO4 + NaOH -> NaH2PO4 + H2O
    > 2. Proceed 50% into the second step of neutralization:
    > NaH2PO4 + NaOH = Na2HPO4 + H2O
    >
    > So, after 50% neutralization your solution is 50/50 H2PO4- and HPO4-2.
    > This is a classic buffer solution, with pH described by so called
    > Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, which in this particluar case takes form:
    >
    > pH = 7.2 + log([HPO4-2]/[H2PO4-])
    >
    > but we already know that [HPO4-2] = [H2PO4-] (remember, solution is
    > 50/50). That leaves us with
    >
    > pH = 7.2
    >
    > There are fine details omitted and hidden assumptions done so nitpickers
    > can bash almost every phrase in this post, but no matter how the'll try,
    > their final pH will be around 7 as well.
    >
    > To get solution with pH around 5.5 you have to neutralize first proton and
    > add very small excess of base. I would call it 35% neutralization
    > (assuming 100% is when the amount of base is three times that of acid, to
    > account for the phosphoric acid "triprocity").
    >
    > Now, you can define 100% neutralization in terms of single proton - ie
    > 100% is when the reaction
    >
    > H3PO4 + NaOH -> NaH2PO4 + H2O
    >
    > is finished. That means full neutralization is 300%. This approach
    > sometimes simplifies calculations. Still, 50% in this case is when you
    > have 50/50 mixture af H3PO4 and H2PO4- - this is another buffer, with pH
    > around 2.2. No matter how you try it is NOT 5.5.
    >
    > Browse pH calculation lectures at
    >
    > http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=pH-calculation&right=toc
    >
    > if you need more. Or play with pH calculator from
    >
    > http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=BATE&right=pH-calculator
    >
    > to see for yourself how the pH changes for different solutions. There is a
    > 30 day free trial so you can do it for free.
    >
    > Borek


    Wow. Thank you very much. (No wonder I didn't get it!)

    When you say "full neutralization is 300%," is that because you need
    three times as many molecules of NaOH (sodium hydroxide) as you have of
    H3PO4 (phosphoric acid)? Why did you use NaOH in the example?

    (Since I see phosphate groups so often in metabolic reactions, I was
    surprised to read that the phosphoric acid in soft drinks might cause
    problems.)


    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

  18. #18
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?


    Another silly question, Borek!

    Molony says:

    -----
    Foods contain ... two groups [of acids];

    [M]etabolisable acids ... which can be broken down and completely
    destroyed For example citric acid, acetic acid, lactic acid etc.

    And

    [N]on metabolisable or fixed acids which are not destroyed by the body.
    For example hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid, phosphoric acid etc.
    -----


    Are these two categories simply (1) organic and (2) inorganic acids,
    or is that too simple?


    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

  19. #19
    Borek Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulant for making Tofu ?

    On Thu, 08 May 2008 01:07:52 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > When you say "full neutralization is 300%," is that because you need
    > three times as many molecules of NaOH (sodium hydroxide) as you have of
    > H3PO4 (phosphoric acid)?


    Yes, that's neutralization stoichiometry.

    > Why did you use NaOH in the example?


    Why not? Neutralization reactions are easiest to analyze when you use
    strong acids/bases in calculations. NaOH or KOH are commonly used for that
    purpose when speaking acid neutralization, HCl - when speaking about base
    neutralization.

    Borek
    --
    http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=BATE&right=pH-calculator
    http://www.chembuddy.com/?left=Buffe...fer-calculator

  20. #20
    Borek Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulant for making Tofu ?

    On Thu, 08 May 2008 07:48:23 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > -----
    > Foods contain ... two groups [of acids];
    >
    > [M]etabolisable acids ... which can be broken down and completely
    > destroyed For example citric acid, acetic acid, lactic acid etc.
    >
    > And
    >
    > [N]on metabolisable or fixed acids which are not destroyed by the body.
    > For example hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid, phosphoric acid etc.
    > -----
    >
    > Are these two categories simply (1) organic and (2) inorganic acids,
    > or is that too simple?


    It can work as a first approximation, but it is very likely there are
    organic acids that'll will be not metabolised.

    Borek
    --
    http://www.chembuddy.com
    http://www.ph-meter.info

  21. #21
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    Borek wrote:
    > On Thu, 08 May 2008 01:07:52 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> When you say "full neutralization is 300%," is that because you need
    >> three times as many molecules of NaOH (sodium hydroxide) as you have of
    >> H3PO4 (phosphoric acid)?

    >
    > Yes, that's neutralization stoichiometry.
    >
    >> Why did you use NaOH in the example?

    >
    > Why not? Neutralization reactions are easiest to analyze when you use
    > strong acids/bases in calculations. NaOH or KOH are commonly used for that
    > purpose when speaking acid neutralization, HCl - when speaking about base
    > neutralization.


    That's what I thought. (I'm trying to catch up on the chemistry I
    missed when I dropped out.)

    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

  22. #22
    Marshall Price Guest

    Default Re: Can I use Potassium Chloride or Potassium Sulphate as the coagulantfor making Tofu ?

    Borek wrote:
    > On Thu, 08 May 2008 07:48:23 +0200, Marshall Price <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> -----
    >> Foods contain ... two groups [of acids];
    >>
    >> [M]etabolisable acids ... which can be broken down and completely
    >> destroyed For example citric acid, acetic acid, lactic acid etc.
    >>
    >> And
    >>
    >> [N]on metabolisable or fixed acids which are not destroyed by the body.
    >> For example hydrochloric acid, sulphuric acid, phosphoric acid etc.
    >> -----
    >>
    >> Are these two categories simply (1) organic and (2) inorganic acids,
    >> or is that too simple?

    >
    > It can work as a first approximation, but it is very likely there are
    > organic acids that'll will be not metabolised.


    They'd be organic, but not carboxylic acids?

    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c

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