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Brain Injury And Delusion
  1. #1
    ironjustice Guest

    Default Brain Injury And Delusion

    Delusions associated with consistent pattern of brain injury

    A new study provides a novel theory for how delusions arise and why
    they persist. NYU Langone Medical Center researcher Orrin Devinsky,
    MD, performed an in-depth analysis of patients with certain delusions
    and brain disorders revealing a consistent pattern of injury to the
    frontal lobe and right hemisphere of the human brain. The cognitive
    deficits caused by these injuries to the right hemisphere, leads to
    the over compensation by the left hemisphere of the brain for the
    injury, resulting in delusions. The article entitled "Delusional
    misidentifications and duplications: Right brain lesions, left brain
    delusions" appears in the latest issue of the journal of Neurology.

    "Problems caused by these brain injuries include impairment in
    monitoring of self, awareness of errors, and incorrectly identifying
    what is familiar and what is a work of fiction," said Dr. Devinsky,
    professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery and Director of
    the NYU Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. "However,
    delusions result from the loss of these functions as well as the over
    activation of the left hemisphere and its language structures, that
    'create a story', a story which cannot be edited and modified to
    account for reality. Delusions result from right hemisphere lesions,
    but it is the left hemisphere that is deluded."

    Often bizarre in content and held with absolute certainty, delusions
    are pathologic beliefs that remain fixed despite clear evidence that
    they are incorrect. "Delusions are common problems in a variety of
    psychiatric and neurological disorders," said Dr. Devinsky.
    "Psychiatric disorders with delusions, for example- schizophrenia,
    have been proven to have functional and structural brain pathology.
    But now improved diagnostic techniques are allowing us to have
    increased identification of neurologic disorders among other patient
    populations with delusions."

    In the study, the author finds that most neurologic patients with
    delusions usually have lesions in the right hemisphere and/or
    bifrontal areas. For example, the neurological disorders of
    Confabulation (incorrect or distorted statements made without
    conscious effort to deceive), Capgras (the ability to consciously
    recognize familiar faces but not emotionally connect with them) and
    Prosopagnosia (patients who may fail to recognize spouses or their own
    face but generate an unconscious response to familiar faces) result
    from right sided lesions.

    The right hemisphere of the brain dominates self recognition,
    emotional familiarity and ego boundaries. After injury, the left
    hemisphere tends to have a creative narrator leading to excessive,
    false explanations. The resistance of delusions to change despite
    clear evidence that they are wrong likely reflects frontal dysfunction
    of the brain, which impairs the ability to monitor self and to
    recognize and correct inaccurate memories and familiarity assessments.
    Thus, right hemisphere lesions may cause delusions by disrupting the
    relation between and the monitoring of psychic, emotional and physical
    self to people, places, and even body parts. This explains why content
    specific delusions involve people places or things of personal
    significance and distort ones relation to oneself, the author
    explains.

    "Our knowledge of delusions is limited by our ability to comprehend
    the patients irrational thought process," said Dr. Devinsky. "The
    pathogenesis of delusions likely includes many mechanisms that span
    overlapping psychological, cognitive and neurological disorders.
    Future research should explore the psychological, cognitive, and
    pyschologic-anatomic systems that change during the emergence and
    resolution of delusions as well as strategies to treat delusions."

    Examples of Various Research Reviewed

    In one study, nine patients with right hemisphere infarctions at a
    stroke rehabilitation unit had frequent delusion. While size of the
    stroke did not correlate when compared to the control group, the
    presence of brain atrophy was a significant predictor of delusions.
    When delusions occurred, it was usually caused by a right hemisphere
    lesion. Also, one study pointed out that delusional patients with
    Alzheimer's disease usually have significantly more right frontal lobe
    damage.

    Other research showed that Reduplicative Paramnesia and Capgras
    syndrome cases with unilateral brain lesions strongly implicate the
    right hemisphere, usually the frontal lobe of the brain. Among 69
    patients with Reduplicative Paramnesia, lesions were primarily in the
    right hemisphere in 36 cases (52%), bilateral in 28 (41%) and left
    hemisphere in 5 (7%) -- a sevenfold increase of right over left-sided
    lesions. Similarly in 26 Capras patients, lesions were primarily in
    the right hemisphere in 8 (32 %), bilateral in 16 (62 %) and left
    sided in 2 (7%)- a four-fold increase of right over left-sided
    lesions. For both delusional syndromes, many bilaterial cases had
    maximal damage in the right hemisphere.

    Among another study of 29 cases of delusional misidentification
    syndromes, all patients had right hemisphere pathology, while 15 (52
    %) had left hemisphere damage. Fourteen had exclusively right
    hemisphere damage but none had isolated left hemisphere damage. When
    lateralized lesions are found, right hemisphere lesions are more
    common in other delusional misidentification and content specific
    delusions. Frontal lesions are strongly implicated in
    misidentification syndromes. Exclusively frontal lesions were
    associated with delusions in 10 of 29 (34.5) cases- four with right
    frontal and six with bifrontal lesions. None had lesions sparing the
    frontal lobes.


    Who loves ya.
    Tom


    Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
    http://tinyurl.com/2r2nkh


    Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://tinyurl.com/4rq595


    DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://tinyurl.com/zk9fk


  2. #2
    Branimir Maksimovic Guest

    Default Re: Brain Injury And Delusion

    On Feb 3, 11:41*am, ironjustice <teamtan...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Delusions associated with consistent pattern of brain injury
    >
    > A new study provides a novel theory for how delusions arise and why
    > they persist. NYU Langone Medical Center researcher Orrin Devinsky,
    > MD, performed an in-depth analysis of patients with certain delusions
    > and brain disorders revealing a consistent pattern of injury to the
    > frontal lobe and right hemisphere of the human brain. The cognitive
    > deficits caused by these injuries to the right hemisphere, leads to
    > the over compensation by the left hemisphere of the brain for the
    > injury, resulting in delusions. The article entitled "Delusional
    > misidentifications and duplications: Right brain lesions, left brain
    > delusions" appears in the latest issue of the journal of Neurology.
    >
    > "Problems caused by these brain injuries include impairment in
    > monitoring of self, awareness of errors, and incorrectly identifying
    > what is familiar and what is a work of fiction," said Dr. Devinsky,
    > professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery and Director of
    > the NYU Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. "However,
    > delusions result from the loss of these functions as well as the over
    > activation of the left hemisphere and its language structures, that
    > 'create a story', a story which cannot be edited and modified to
    > account for reality. Delusions result from right hemisphere lesions,
    > but it is the left hemisphere that is deluded."
    >
    > Often bizarre in content and held with absolute certainty, delusions
    > are pathologic beliefs that remain fixed despite clear evidence that
    > they are incorrect. "Delusions are common problems in a variety of
    > psychiatric and neurological disorders," said Dr. Devinsky.
    > "Psychiatric disorders with delusions, for example- schizophrenia,
    > have been proven to have functional and structural brain pathology.
    > But now improved diagnostic techniques are allowing us to have
    > increased identification of neurologic disorders among other patient
    > populations with delusions."
    >
    > In the study, the author finds that most neurologic patients with
    > delusions usually have lesions in the right hemisphere and/or
    > bifrontal areas. For example, the neurological disorders of
    > Confabulation (incorrect or distorted statements made without
    > conscious effort to deceive), Capgras (the ability to consciously
    > recognize familiar faces but not emotionally connect with them) and
    > Prosopagnosia (patients who may fail to recognize spouses or their own
    > face but generate an unconscious response to familiar faces) result
    > from right sided lesions.
    >
    > The right hemisphere of the brain dominates self recognition,
    > emotional familiarity and ego boundaries. After injury, the left
    > hemisphere tends to have a creative narrator leading to excessive,
    > false explanations. The resistance of delusions to change despite
    > clear evidence that they are wrong likely reflects frontal dysfunction
    > of the brain, which impairs the ability to monitor self and to
    > recognize and correct inaccurate memories and familiarity assessments.
    > Thus, right hemisphere lesions may cause delusions by disrupting the
    > relation between and the monitoring of psychic, emotional and physical
    > self to people, places, and even body parts. This explains why content
    > specific delusions involve people places or things of personal
    > significance and distort ones relation to oneself, the author
    > explains.
    >
    > "Our knowledge of delusions is limited by our ability to comprehend
    > the patients irrational thought process," said Dr. Devinsky. "The
    > pathogenesis of delusions likely includes many mechanisms that span
    > overlapping psychological, cognitive and neurological disorders.
    > Future research should explore the psychological, cognitive, and
    > pyschologic-anatomic systems that change during the emergence and
    > resolution of delusions as well as strategies to treat delusions."
    >
    > Examples of Various Research Reviewed
    >
    > In one study, nine patients with right hemisphere infarctions at a
    > stroke rehabilitation unit had frequent delusion. While size of the
    > stroke did not correlate when compared to the control group, the
    > presence of brain atrophy was a significant predictor of delusions.
    > When delusions occurred, it was usually caused by a right hemisphere
    > lesion. Also, one study pointed out that delusional patients with
    > Alzheimer's disease usually have significantly more right frontal lobe
    > damage.
    >
    > Other research showed that Reduplicative Paramnesia and Capgras
    > syndrome cases with unilateral brain lesions strongly implicate the
    > right hemisphere, usually the frontal lobe of the brain. Among 69
    > patients with Reduplicative Paramnesia, lesions were primarily in the
    > right hemisphere in 36 cases (52%), bilateral in 28 (41%) and left
    > hemisphere in 5 (7%) -- a sevenfold increase of right over left-sided
    > lesions. Similarly in 26 Capras patients, lesions were primarily in
    > the right hemisphere in 8 (32 %), bilateral in 16 (62 %) and left
    > sided in 2 (7%)- a four-fold increase of right over left-sided
    > lesions. For both delusional syndromes, many bilaterial cases had
    > maximal damage in the right hemisphere.
    >
    > Among another study of 29 cases of delusional misidentification
    > syndromes, all patients had right hemisphere pathology, while 15 (52
    > %) had left hemisphere damage. Fourteen had exclusively right
    > hemisphere damage but none had isolated left hemisphere damage. When
    > lateralized lesions are found, right hemisphere lesions are more
    > common in other delusional misidentification and content specific
    > delusions. Frontal lesions are strongly implicated in
    > misidentification syndromes. Exclusively frontal lesions were
    > associated with delusions in 10 of 29 (34.5) cases- four with right
    > frontal and six with bifrontal lesions. None had lesions sparing the
    > frontal lobes.
    >
    > Who loves ya.
    > Tom
    >
    > Jesus Was A Vegetarian!http://tinyurl.com/2r2nkh
    >
    > Man Is A Herbivore!http://tinyurl.com/4rq595
    >
    > DEAD PEOPLE WALKINGhttp://tinyurl.com/zk9fk


    Comon people. This is classical; DEVIL BULL****

    Pouring from empty to VOID
    that is science

    Ultimate GOAL of science is to destroy this Earth.
    Which IDIOT MAKED HYDROGEN BOMB
    Insane people are scientist. Stupidier ****s I never saw
    in this life.
    EGO IDIOTS> SELFISH PRICKS LOW LIFE SCUMS.
    Those are scientists.

    LOVE

  3. #3
    Andrew Heenan Guest

    Default Re: Brain Injury And Delusion

    "Branimir Maksimovic" <[email protected]> wrote ...
    > Ultimate GOAL of science is to destroy this Earth.
    > Which IDIOT MAKED HYDROGEN BOMB
    > Insane people are scientist. Stupidier ****s I never
    > saw in this life.


    Yes, Branimir much prefers murderers, rapists, thieves, liars and reality TV
    stars.

    Twat
    --

    Andrew

    The trick when dealing with cross-posting idiots is to ignore them, or reply
    just once - to every group *except your own* - and kill file the idiot. If
    we all do that, eventually the idiots have no place left to go. In the rare
    event that you KNOW which group it pollutes, then delete all groups except
    that one. So while I apologise for this cross post, you know what to do.
    http://www.flayme.com/



  4. #4
    Miguel Alberto Guest

    Default Re: Brain Injury And Delusion

    Many diagnosis called "schizophrenia" have not been schizophrenia.
    Some have been injury to any number of places in the brain, heavy metal
    poisoning, or bipolar disorder.
    To discover injuries MRI's can be used.
    Schizophrenia has been found to be having too many axons and
    dendrites between the brain's neurons. A biopsy will reveal this. Also,
    this condition is caused by a gene called DISC1. This can be revealed by
    a blood test.
    Heavy metal poisoning can be revealed by a brain biopsy. The
    malformed sodium pumps of bipolar disorder can be seen.
    There is no excuse for unsupported condemnations of schizophrenic,
    or need for government investigations into disability authenticity. It's
    all in the appropriate cells.


  5. #5
    ironjustice Guest

    Default Re: Brain Injury And Delusion

    On Feb 3, 2:41*am, ironjustice <teamtan...@hotmail.com> wrote: The
    article entitled "Delusional
    misidentifications and duplications: Right brain lesions, left brain
    delusions" <<

    Whacking someone hard in the head causes blood to spill in the
    brain .. and .. coincidentally .. causes ADHD.


    Iron accumulation .. ?

    "Right putamen lesions specifically associated with ADHD symptoms"

    Structural brain change in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    identified by meta-analysis
    Ian Ellison-Wright1,3 , Zo Ellison-Wright2 and Ed Bullmore3


    1Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust, Salisbury,
    UK


    2Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, Dorset County Hospital
    NHS Foundation Trust, Dorchester, UK


    3Brain Mapping Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK


    BMC Psychiatry 2008, 8:51doi:10.1186/1471-244X-8-51


    Published: 30 June 2008


    Abstract
    Background
    The authors sought to map gray matter changes in Attention Deficit
    Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) using a novel technique incorporating
    neuro-imaging and genetic meta-analysis methods.


    Methods
    A systematic search was conducted for voxel-based structural magnetic
    resonance imaging studies of patients with ADHD (or with related
    disorders) in relation to comparison groups. The authors carried out
    meta-analyses of the co-ordinates of gray matter differences. For the
    meta-analyses they hybridised the standard method of Activation
    Likelihood Estimation (ALE) with the rank approach used in Genome
    Scan
    Meta-Analysis (GSMA). This system detects three-dimensional
    conjunctions of co-ordinates from multiple studies and permits the
    weighting of studies in relation to sample size.


    Results
    For gray matter decreases, there were 7 studies including a total of
    114 patients with ADHD (or related disorders) and 143 comparison
    subjects. Meta-analysis of these studies identified a significant
    regional gray matter reduction in ADHD in the right putamen/globus
    pallidus region. Four studies reported gray matter increases in ADHD
    but no regional increase was identified by meta-analysis.


    Conclusion
    In ADHD there is gray matter reduction in the right putamen/globus
    pallidus region. This may be an anatomical marker for dysfunction in
    frontostriatal circuits mediating cognitive control. Right putamen
    lesions have been specifically associated with ADHD symptoms after
    closed head injuries in children.


    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------*-----


    Terms and Conditions Privacy statement Information for advertisers
    Jobs at BMC Contact us
    1999-2008 BioMed Central Ltd unless otherwise stated. Part of
    Springer Science+Business Media.


    Who loves ya.
    Tom


    Jesus Was A Vegetarian!
    http://tinyurl.com/2r2nkh


    Man Is A Herbivore!
    http://tinyurl.com/a3cc3


    DEAD PEOPLE WALKING
    http://tinyurl.com/zk9fk

    > Delusions associated with consistent pattern of brain injury
    >
    > A new study provides a novel theory for how delusions arise and why
    > they persist. NYU Langone Medical Center researcher Orrin Devinsky,
    > MD, performed an in-depth analysis of patients with certain delusions
    > and brain disorders revealing a consistent pattern of injury to the
    > frontal lobe and right hemisphere of the human brain. The cognitive
    > deficits caused by these injuries to the right hemisphere, leads to
    > the over compensation by the left hemisphere of the brain for the
    > injury, resulting in delusions. The article entitled "Delusional
    > misidentifications and duplications: Right brain lesions, left brain
    > delusions" appears in the latest issue of the journal of Neurology.
    >
    > "Problems caused by these brain injuries include impairment in
    > monitoring of self, awareness of errors, and incorrectly identifying
    > what is familiar and what is a work of fiction," said Dr. Devinsky,
    > professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery and Director of
    > the NYU Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Medical Center. "However,
    > delusions result from the loss of these functions as well as the over
    > activation of the left hemisphere and its language structures, that
    > 'create a story', a story which cannot be edited and modified to
    > account for reality. Delusions result from right hemisphere lesions,
    > but it is the left hemisphere that is deluded."
    >
    > Often bizarre in content and held with absolute certainty, delusions
    > are pathologic beliefs that remain fixed despite clear evidence that
    > they are incorrect. "Delusions are common problems in a variety of
    > psychiatric and neurological disorders," said Dr. Devinsky.
    > "Psychiatric disorders with delusions, for example- schizophrenia,
    > have been proven to have functional and structural brain pathology.
    > But now improved diagnostic techniques are allowing us to have
    > increased identification of neurologic disorders among other patient
    > populations with delusions."
    >
    > In the study, the author finds that most neurologic patients with
    > delusions usually have lesions in the right hemisphere and/or
    > bifrontal areas. For example, the neurological disorders of
    > Confabulation (incorrect or distorted statements made without
    > conscious effort to deceive), Capgras (the ability to consciously
    > recognize familiar faces but not emotionally connect with them) and
    > Prosopagnosia (patients who may fail to recognize spouses or their own
    > face but generate an unconscious response to familiar faces) result
    > from right sided lesions.
    >
    > The right hemisphere of the brain dominates self recognition,
    > emotional familiarity and ego boundaries. After injury, the left
    > hemisphere tends to have a creative narrator leading to excessive,
    > false explanations. The resistance of delusions to change despite
    > clear evidence that they are wrong likely reflects frontal dysfunction
    > of the brain, which impairs the ability to monitor self and to
    > recognize and correct inaccurate memories and familiarity assessments.
    > Thus, right hemisphere lesions may cause delusions by disrupting the
    > relation between and the monitoring of psychic, emotional and physical
    > self to people, places, and even body parts. This explains why content
    > specific delusions involve people places or things of personal
    > significance and distort ones relation to oneself, the author
    > explains.
    >
    > "Our knowledge of delusions is limited by our ability to comprehend
    > the patients irrational thought process," said Dr. Devinsky. "The
    > pathogenesis of delusions likely includes many mechanisms that span
    > overlapping psychological, cognitive and neurological disorders.
    > Future research should explore the psychological, cognitive, and
    > pyschologic-anatomic systems that change during the emergence and
    > resolution of delusions as well as strategies to treat delusions."
    >
    > Examples of Various Research Reviewed
    >
    > In one study, nine patients with right hemisphere infarctions at a
    > stroke rehabilitation unit had frequent delusion. While size of the
    > stroke did not correlate when compared to the control group, the
    > presence of brain atrophy was a significant predictor of delusions.
    > When delusions occurred, it was usually caused by a right hemisphere
    > lesion. Also, one study pointed out that delusional patients with
    > Alzheimer's disease usually have significantly more right frontal lobe
    > damage.
    >
    > Other research showed that Reduplicative Paramnesia and Capgras
    > syndrome cases with unilateral brain lesions strongly implicate the
    > right hemisphere, usually the frontal lobe of the brain. Among 69
    > patients with Reduplicative Paramnesia, lesions were primarily in the
    > right hemisphere in 36 cases (52%), bilateral in 28 (41%) and left
    > hemisphere in 5 (7%) -- a sevenfold increase of right over left-sided
    > lesions. Similarly in 26 Capras patients, lesions were primarily in
    > the right hemisphere in 8 (32 %), bilateral in 16 (62 %) and left
    > sided in 2 (7%)- a four-fold increase of right over left-sided
    > lesions. For both delusional syndromes, many bilaterial cases had
    > maximal damage in the right hemisphere.
    >
    > Among another study of 29 cases of delusional misidentification
    > syndromes, all patients had right hemisphere pathology, while 15 (52
    > %) had left hemisphere damage. Fourteen had exclusively right
    > hemisphere damage but none had isolated left hemisphere damage. When
    > lateralized lesions are found, right hemisphere lesions are more
    > common in other delusional misidentification and content specific
    > delusions. Frontal lesions are strongly implicated in
    > misidentification syndromes. Exclusively frontal lesions were
    > associated with delusions in 10 of 29 (34.5) cases- four with right
    > frontal and six with bifrontal lesions. None had lesions sparing the
    > frontal lobes.
    >
    > Who loves ya.
    > Tom
    >
    > Jesus Was A Vegetarian!http://tinyurl.com/2r2nkh
    >
    > Man Is A Herbivore!http://tinyurl.com/4rq595
    >
    > DEAD PEOPLE WALKINGhttp://tinyurl.com/zk9fk



  6. #6
    zerosky Guest

    Default Re: Brain Injury And Delusion


    "Andrew Heenan" <fire...@will.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Branimir Maksimovic" <[email protected]> wrote ...
    >> Ultimate GOAL of science is to destroy this Earth.
    >> Which IDIOT MAKED HYDROGEN BOMB
    >> Insane people are scientist. Stupidier ****s I never
    >> saw in this life.

    >
    > Yes, Branimir much prefers murderers, rapists, thieves, liars and reality
    > TV stars.
    >
    > Twat
    > --
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > The trick when dealing with cross-posting idiots is to ignore them, or
    > reply just once - to every group *except your own* - and kill file the
    > idiot. If we all do that, eventually the idiots have no place left to go.
    > In the rare event that you KNOW which group it pollutes, then delete all
    > groups except that one. So while I apologise for this cross post, you know
    > what to do.
    > http://www.flayme.com/
    >


    he's no idiot..

    imo


  7. #7
    QN Guest

    Default Re: Brain Injury And Delusion

    Thank you for the interesting crosspost to the alt.support.schizophrenia
    group.

    Although I have been diagnosed as schizophrenic, and later schizoaffective,
    I have never had any halucinations. My trouble was social anxiety,
    delusions of reference, and Capgra-like symptoms.

    Based on your post, there may be a probability of my having right frontal
    lobe damage. In my case, at no point did the medical community do any kind
    of X-rays, MRIs, PET scans, or other examinations of the brain. f-MRIs seem
    to only be done in studies.

    My birth was difficult. Forceps were used.

    There is no other instance of mental illness in my family tree.

    I rarely get headaches. On the occasions I do, the headache is either "U"
    shaped at the top of the head, or in the *right front* of the head.

    I was first hospitalized in 1977, and have been on disability for about 11
    years.

    I have even been seen at Stanford. At no point do psychiatrists consider
    any kind of objective testing.

    In a way, this is not really good news. You have reduced my probability of
    being cured in future decades. (but it is better to have the best
    information anyway)




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